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You are our   Visitor

 

The February 21, 2017 Edition

of

The Newsleaf

 

Vol. 14  Issue 8

BETWEEN THE ISSUES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FRONT PAGE

 

ACCHS WRESTLERS REACH STAND

Hunter Ostertag is our Regional Champion at 138#! Ryan Hanshaw qualified for State Wrestling in Hays with a 4th place win today at Regionals and Makaea Forbes, represented our school in McPherson, Kansas at the first ever Girls State Championships.

  

Season Opens - S. Helen Buenings Student Art Show! March 1st-April 2, 2017

Creative works from Atchison and Hiawatha art students in grades K through 12 will be on display during the month of March at the Muchnic Gallery, in Atchison, Kansas.  This multi-media exhibit, sponsored by the Atchison Art Association, highlights Youth Art Month, a national celebration recognizing the value of art education for all children.  

The S. Helen Buening Student Art Show will be on display and open to the public Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday 1-5pm begin March 1, and running through April 2nd, 2017.  Opening Reception for family and friends will be Sunday, March 5th, 1-5pm.

 

Kansas Wildlife, Parks And Tourism Gets New Licensing System

PRATT – In late February, the computer license sales and reservation system the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism (KDWPT) has used for many years will be no more. A new and improved system, provided by Active Network, will go into full operation. Active Network has provided the software and point-of-sale hardware for 11 years that allowed KDWPT to accept campsite and cabin reservations and sell licenses online, maintaining all license records electronically. That contract expired and a new contract, with some changes, is now in place.

License buyers and campers won’t notice a big difference; however, the current license sales system will shut down at 9:45 p.m. on Feb. 18, and the new system will be online at 8 a.m. on Feb. 22. No license or permit sales will be available through the system for roughly three days. The campsite and cabin reservation system will shut down at 12:01 a.m., Feb. 20 and go back online at 6 p.m., Feb. 21.

While it may be inconvenient for anyone who tries to buy a license or make a reservation during the downtime, this time is important to allow data to be transferred, configurations to be completed and to ensure everything is working properly before going live. The new system will retain the KDWPT numbers of everyone who purchased a hunting or fishing license in the old system, and there will be no changes in pricing.

The new system will provide some advantages to users, including allowing customers to purchase hunting and fishing licenses at the same time they make camping or cabin reservations. It will allow customers to reprint licenses within 48 hours if they were unable to print during the transaction. Other features include allowing customers to browse available licenses and permits before they make a purchase, buy licenses or permits for multiple years when available (such as buying a 2017 hunting license and a 2016 HIP stamp) and logging in with an email address to edit personal information on record such as address and phone number.

One significant change with the new system involves permits that have carcass tags attached, such as deer, turkey, elk, and antelope, which could have been purchased from home and printed out on a desktop printer under the old system. This caused many issues for Law Enforcement since there was no way to prohibit someone from printing multiple carcass tags with one permit. In the new system, permits with carcass tags will have to be purchased and issued through a license agent or over the phone, in which case the permit/carcass tag will be mailed to the customer.

 

2ND AMENDMENT RIGHTS DO NOT END AT THE FRONT DOOR

TOPEKA – (February 17, 2017) – Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt yesterday asked the U.S. Supreme Court to strike down a California gun restriction that prohibits citizens from carrying handguns outside their homes for self-defense.

In a brief asking the U.S. Supreme Court to review a lower court’s decision, Schmidt and the attorneys general of 25 other states argue the fundamental right to bear arms extends beyond the home. The case centers on a San Diego County gun restriction.

 “The San Diego County sheriff’s licensing scheme effectively bans the core right to bear arms for ordinary, law-abiding citizens and, consequently violates the Second Amendment,” the attorneys general wrote. “The experience of amici States demonstrates that the restrictions on bearing arms in San Diego County cannot withstand any level of scrutiny. Although the amici States share the same compelling interests in protecting the health and safety of their citizens, they have been able to do so without curtailing the fundamental right of their citizens to bear arms.”

In addition to Kansas, the other states joining the brief were Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

The case is Edward Peruta v State of California. A copy of the brief is available at http://bit.ly/2ls1Go9.

 

ALL AROUND US

DAR NEWS

The Atchison Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution met on February 11, 2017 at Snowball diner, Janice Johnson was the hostess.

Diana Stanton presented a program on DNA and the process of its use through ancestral search.  In 2014 NSDAR started accepting Y DNA (male) as proof of direct linage.  The MT DNA traces through the female linage.

Information was shared on the KSDAR state conference to be held in Topeka on April 20-22, 2017.

A  DAR Celebration to Women Veterans History month will be held on March 30th on the Leavenworth Campus at 9:00 a.m.

Our Chapter is interested in Military service personal that will be deploying in the future.  We hope to be an encouragement to them.  If you have a name to submit please call Janice at 913.367.1205.

The next meeting will be March 11, 2017 if you would like any information please call 785.988.1150

 

FARMERETTE FEBRUARY MEETING

After cancelling the January 2017 meeting due to bad weather, the Farmerettes FCE Unit meet Friday, February 9th at the Effingham City Council Meeting Room. The meeting was called to order by Virginia Foley.  Delicious breakfast items were served by hostesses, Evelyn Lorenz and Sally Ellerman.  Twenty members and three guests answered roll call and reported 97 Action Hours and 50 Educational Hours for the past two months.  Guests were Sue Richenburg, Julie Boyle, and Diann Nielson.

Farmerettes will send a donation to the ACCHS after Prom Project. They will also participate in DCF’s project for quilts to foster children at Christmas time.  The Flag Committee will continue to display American flags on various days in Effingham this year. The Flower Committee will also plant flowers in the spring along Effingham’s Main Street.  Several members are interested in the County FCE Council’s project to make and display Barn Quilts.  A lesson date will soon be determined by the committee of Carol Lintner, Virginia Foley, and Mary Lou Bowen.  It is planned for a display of Barn Quilts at the county fair this year.

The K-State educational lesson on Frauds and Scams was attended on February 2 by four Farmerette members.  Sally Ellerman and Diann Nielson presented another K-State educational lesson on “Is It Safe?’ GMO’s/Organic Foods.  This discussed genetically engineered foods for consumers.

The next meeting will be a county wide meeting in March with the Terry FCE Unit in Cummings.  And the April 14th Farmerettes meeting will be at the Effingham City Council Room at 9 AM with Esther Willis and Judy Smith as hostesses.

 

EFFIE LADIE

The Ravishing Ritzy Effie Ladies has been busy socializing this month.  On February 4, six members had a good time at the Nite Circle’s February Fellowship at the Union Church. They enjoyed the delicious meal prepared by Chuck Hawk and then they played Bunco, which they found very entertaining.  Ruth Beal and Marcie Feldkamp planned the event. 

On February 12th ten members attended the Mary Martha Soup Dinner at the Effingham Union Church. A couple of the Effie Ladies were members of Mary Martha and they were working.  Everyone enjoyed their soup and pie.  The event was planned by Virginia Blunt and Eileen Ellerman.

 

BOOK DISCUSSION

Ten women gathered at the Effingham Community Library February 15th to discuss Bob Dole One Soldier’s Story, Bob Dole’s memoir written in 2005.  Every one really enjoyed the book. 

The book took the reader through his childhood in Russell, Kansas to his first year at KU and then his military service and his recovering from his wounds.    Since he was paralyzed after being wounded, he struggled to learn to walk and do things for himself. He never fully recovered, but despite his handicap he excelled and became very successful.  His wife went to college with him to take notes.  But with perseverance by both of them he graduated from college and then went on to get a law degree.  After that he served in U S Congress both as a representative and a senator.  Representing Kansas ably.  He also was a candidate for vice president and the presidency. After he retired from the senate he was asked to spearhead fundraising for the World War II Memorial.  He proudly accepted.  It was finished in 2004.

Bob always felted connected to all our soldiers. Bob wrote in his book that his generation is called the greatest generation, but he thought that every generation that went to war was the greatest generation.

The women enjoyed sharing their memories of him and those, who remember WWII, shared their memories. They were amazed how he prevailed and how successful he was despite his injuries. 

Nancy Keith said that she was so very proud that he represented the values of Kansans.

Alice Johnson shared the following WWII statistics.  From 1941 to 1945 total US Service members was 16,112, 556, Battle deaths was 291,557, other deaths in service (Non-theater) 113,842 making the total deaths over 400,000, Non-mortal woundings were 670,846.  Today there are 696,000 living WWII veterans.  These figures are from Department of Veterans and were updated in 2016. 

 

WORLD DAY OF PRAYER

St. Ann’s Catholic Church in Effingham is hosting World day of Prayer, March 3 at 2:00 p.m.  The Union Church women will be helping them with the program.  This year’s program is “Am I Being Unfair to You?” prepared by women of the Philippines.  Women all over the world has been gathering on the first Friday of March to pray, and praise God and also to recognize and celebrate his awesomeness for over a hundred years.  Today there are 170 countries united by their Christian love.

Everyone including men are invited to attend.  

 

MUSCOTAH NEWS ~ Susan Higley

Cancer Support Bingo was held last Saturday. The weather was great and that brought out the Bingo players to enjoy the afternoon. We would like to thank all those who not only came and played but also donated prizes. Half of our proceeds will go to Relay for Life and the other half to help local cancer patients. A special thank you to those who donate just to help our local people. With so many cancer patients the help is needed. Our next Bingo will be Saturday, March 18th from 2 to 4 at the community building. Everyone is invited to come and have fun and help a worthy cause. Our players come mainly from the Horton and Everest area and we have a special group of ladies from Topeka that never miss.

At the Monday, February 20th meeting of the Muscotah City Council, the council members accepted the resignation of Mayor Roy Tacker and president of the council Brian Higley was sworn in to complete his term. Other members of the council are Dale Small, Margaret Jacobs, Daryll Hundley and Susan Higley. There is a vacancy on the council that will need to be filled soon. If you are interested, please contact City Clerk Debbie Liggatt or any of the council members.

Don’t forget the  “Cabin Fever Supper” on Saturday, February 25 from 5 to 7 at the Community Building. The menu, which is really a breakfast one, will be pancakes, link sausage, eggs, coffee. A free will donation will be accepted with the proceeds to go for park and city building improvements. Everyone is welcome. Bring the whole family. The event is sponsored by Muscotah Outreach.

Remember if you have any news items, please call me at 872-3245. It is good to let the readers what is going on in our community.

The first meeting to plan the Rose Festival will be held on Thursday night, February 23 at 6:30 at the Community Building. Anyone interested in helping please come. The Rose Festival will be the first Saturday in June. We can use new ideas and help is always needed. If you cannot make the meeting but are interested in helping, please call 872-3245. 

 

ATCHISON NEWS

Season Opens - S. Helen Buenings Student Art Show! March 1st-April 2, 2017

Creative works from Atchison and Hiawatha art students in grades K through 12 will be on display during the month of March at the Muchnic Gallery, in Atchison, Kansas.  This multi-media exhibit, sponsored by the Atchison Art Association, highlights Youth Art Month, a national celebration recognizing the value of art education for all children.  

The S. Helen Buening Student Art Show will be on display and open to the public Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday 1-5pm begin March 1, and running through April 2nd, 2017.  Opening Reception for family and friends will be Sunday, March 5th, 1-5pm.

 

JackNEW BEGINNINGS ~ Jack Albright

CHILDREN OF GOD ARE PEACEMAKERS

Do you know a person who is so peaceful that their presence makes the atmosphere around them peaceful? It is to such a person that Jesus addresses this statement: “Blessed (happy) are the peacemakers for they shall be called the children of God.” Matt. 5:9.

God created the world and humans in perfect peace and love and harmony. God is the wellspring of peace. Those who drink freely from this spring will become so peaceful that others will want to drink from the same fountain.

God invites everyone to drink freely from this fountain of life-giving water: “And the Spirit and the bride say, “Come!” And let him who hears say, “Come!” And let him who thirsts come. Whoever desires, let him take the water of life freely.” (Rev. 22:17 NKJV)

This article speaks to the hearts of readers who are striving to attain peace. Readers will be introduced to three major steps toward finding peace. First make yourself at peace with God. Next share peace with your friendly neighbor. Then share peace with your estranged neighbor.

Peace with God is available to every person who will accept it. Jesus told his disciple: “Peace I leave with you, My peace I give to you; not as the world gives do I give to you. Let not your heart be troubled, neither let it be afraid.” (John 14:27 NKJV) This promise is available to anyone who will open their hearts and receive it.

Also notice that his peace is not fickle or elusive as are many human peace treaties. “And the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and minds through Christ Jesus. Phil. 4:7 (NKJV). Accepting God’s peace is step one of becoming a peacemaker.

Sharing God’s peace with others becomes one of the greatest blessings that we can experience. Sharing peace has a reciprocal effect in that it blesses the giver as much as it blesses the receiver. One of life’s greatest rewards comes when we share words of comfort and peace with a grieving person. Also Jesus promises his eternal blessing upon those who share his love and peace with those in need. “As you have done it unto one of these, you have done it unto me.”

The story in Luke 10 is about a man who was criminally assaulted, robbed, and left to die beside the road. When a priest approached the man he immediately turned his face and passed him on the other side of the road.

A religious Levite acted a little more religious for he actually went closer to the wounded man and looked at him. He looked but did not touch or physically help him. Perhaps he did something religious, but not practical, by saying: “I will pray for you.”

Then Jesus revealed the surprise hero who was a detested Samaritan, a crossbreed Jew, a mister nobody showed us how to share peace, love, and compassion. He went to the injured man, sanitized, and bandaged his wounds. Then he placed the man on his donkey and took him to an inn and paid for several nights lodging and care.

Could Jesus be asking this challenging question to each of us: “So which of these three do you think was neighbor (peacemaker) to him who fell among the thieves?” (Luke 10:36)

Is this our opportunity to examine our hearts with some honest questions like: “Am I at peace with myself? Am I at peace with God? Am I at peace with members of my family? Am I at peace with friends? Am I willing to become a peacemaker?”

 

FROM PASTOR AL ~ Al Schirmacher

Christian friends,

 “I urge, then, first of all, that petitions, prayers, intercession and thanksgiving be made for all people— for kings and all those in authority, that we may live peaceful and quiet lives in all godliness and holiness. This is good, and pleases God our Savior, who wants all people to be saved and to come to a knowledge of the truth.”

1 Timothy 2:1-4 NIV

Certainly there is a time for activity, for standing up against the current, for voices to be heard.

But we can get stuck in that mode.

So hear these verses today.

Pray, pray passionately, pray for leaders, competent and incompetent.  

Pray for peace, national and personal.

Pray for the ability to quietly go about your business, peacefully living godly lives.

Why?

Such pleases God - goal #1 - and reaches others - goal #2.

Speak up when necessary; but pray more.

Al Schirmacher

 

Singleness

I was surprised by a recent statistic:

50.2% of Americans are single (16 & over, 2014).  This percentage has continued to increase over the last 20+ years.

We are single through choice – through death – through divorce – through a variety of circumstances and decisions.

Yet churches are often guilty of emphasizing marriage through sermon series, illustrations, seminars etc. while neglecting the needs of the single.

As a pastor, I am just as guilty of this as the next person.

To those I may have impacted, please forgive me.

Fascinating passage on singleness (I Corinthians 7):

 “I would like you to be free from concern. An unmarried man is concerned about the Lord’s affairs—how he can please the Lord. 33 But a married man is concerned about the affairs of this world—how he can please his wife— 34 and his interests are divided. An unmarried woman or virgin is concerned about the Lord’s affairs: Her aim is to be devoted to the Lord in both body and spirit. But a married woman is concerned about the affairs of this world—how she can please her husband. 35 I am saying this for your own good, not to restrict you, but that you may live in a right way in undivided devotion to the Lord.”

Hear this?  Scripture is praising, commending the single person.

Singles have an opportunity to devote themselves to the Lord in a way most marrieds cannot.  Paul is simply being practical, we must focus on and support our spouses.  But if we can just focus on the Lord….

Single, may I urge you to find your completion and your purpose in the Lord?

Married, can I urge you to honor the single?

Blessings to each.

 

Christian friend,

Strong marriages involve getting over ourselves.

Hear I Corinthians 13:

 “Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. It does not dishonor others, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres.”

1 Corinthians 13:4-7 NIV

We are naturally the antithesis of this passage, often impatient, unkind, self-glorifying while deriding others, angry, listing each offense, self-protecting.  Yet God calls us away, higher, deeper.

God makes two one (Mark 10:8-9); sacrificial care for the spouse maintains the unity, selfish assertion rips and tears the oneness.

Of course, the great mystery here is that the more we follow His path of sacrificial love, the more we become the true self He intended.

 

Christian friend,

God says,

"Never will I leave you;

Never will I forsake you."

(Hebrews 13:5)

Beautiful sounding sentiment, one to be embraced.  But it doesn't occur in a void, nor during a mountaintop experience.

Context is so important.  Verses 1-5 describe three experiences:

Sacrificially extending hospitality to strangers and visiting prisoners, both potentially intimidating endeavors

Marital/sexual struggles

Financial shortfalls, contentment issues.

God's promised presence is more than theoretical, more than vaguely comforting, it is supremely practical.

What tough issue can you, can I, practice the presence of God in today?

 

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

 

AMERICA’S MOST ADMIRED ~ John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau

Nobody likes us. Everyone’s out to get us. We can’t buy a break.

Don’t believe it. It isn’t so. Never has been and hopefully never will be.

Farmers and ranchers still rank at the top of America’s most admired professions. This A-list is comprised of those who serve others, including firefighters, doctors, nurses, farmers and ranchers (who feed the world), police, teachers and engineers who build things.

And when the public thinks of agriculture – two words come to mind.

If you guessed “hard working” you’re right. That’s the ranking in a recent article in Forbes.

Across this country consumers believe farmers are important. When people take the time to think about their importance, most agree farmers feed everyone. They’ll tell you there isn’t anybody who doesn’t need farmers.

Other words used by consumers to describe farmers included necessary, good for society, honest, take care of the land, independent and good family values.

Americans also believe farmers are highly believable when speaking on farm-related issues. When asked if they would believe a farmer talking about the challenges of farming, nearly 90 percent said they would.

Farm wives were deemed even more believable than farmers. Depending on the topic, university researchers or scientists could be just as believable as farmers while environmentalists and government officials rated less favorably.

Most consumers will tell you they believe farmers and ranchers choose their occupation based on the satisfaction it gives them, not the money they make. They also believe when faced with a decision between economics and doing the right thing, most farmers and ranchers would do what is right.

Today’s American consumer also believes farmers have a high level of professional training and competency in agriculture. They also will tell you farmers care about food quality and safety. Nearly 80 percent of the public thought farmers and ranchers do an excellent job of taking care of their farm animals.

Believe it or not, depending on where you look or find information, two of every three people agree the use of land for agriculture is good for the environment. The public believes farmers take care of the land. Nearly half believe farmers and ranchers do an excellent or good job of taking care of the nation’s water.

Don’t listen to what the naysayers say. The public’s image of farmers and ranchers remains strong. Overall, the public appreciates the jobs farmers are doing and they like hearing from them. That means farmers should take every opportunity to speak up about their profession.

Stand up for agriculture. Say what’s on your mind and speak from the heart. American farmers and ranchers can help shape the message and mold the public image of their profession in their own likenesses, rather than having it molded for them by dictionary synonyms or advertising’s stereotypical overalls and pitchforks.

John Schlageck is a leading commentator on agriculture and rural Kansas. Born and raised on a diversified farm in northwestern Kansas, his writing reflects a lifetime of experience, knowledge and passion. 

 

A Farm Crisis in the High Plains By U.S. Senator Jerry Moran (R-Kan.)

As a resident of the community, I was pleased to learn that Manhattan, Kansas, is set to host the first Senate Agriculture Committee farm bill hearing – a fitting location chosen by my colleague Chairman Pat Roberts to kick off formal discussions on the challenges and opportunities in authorizing our next farm bill.

The hearing will offer an opportunity for farmers and ranchers to voice the concerns I heard during my town hall meetings in each of Kansas’ 105 counties during the last Congress. It’s clear that producers are hurting and the downturn in the farm economy is impacting rural America. Overall farm income has been cut in half since 2013 and is likely to continue to decline this year, making it one of the worst economic times in farm country since the Great Depression.

So far, the farm bill discussion has largely been focused on the unique challenges facing dairy and cotton producers. These farmers are important to Kansas and the country, and I am eager to be an ally in working toward solutions for these producers. But, let us not forget the farm crisis in the High Plains that has hit wheat and sorghum farmers especially hard. Acres planted to hard red winter wheat in Kansas are at the second lowest level in the past 100 years, reflecting the economic reality currently facing wheat producers. The threat of the sugarcane aphid to sorghum is making it harder to make a profit on the traditionally low-input crop, meaning acres may fall by another 30 percent this year.

The 2014 Farm Bill has been successful on many fronts by protecting crop insurance and renewing our commitment to agriculture research, conservation and rural development programs. However, economic stress in farm country has also exposed weaknesses in the current legislation. The next farm bill must address inequities between counties in the Agricultural Risk Coverage (ARC) program, provide stronger protection in Title I farm programs against extended periods of low prices, and reduce the threat of burdensome regulations that harm livestock producers.

While major revisions in farm policy are most appropriately addressed in the context of a farm bill, I’ve used my role on the Senate Agriculture Appropriations Subcommittee to build on the successes of the 2014 Farm Bill, as well as attempt to address its shortcomings. The fiscal year 2017 Agriculture Appropriations bill increases agriculture research funding, expands food aid programs that export American commodities, and helps to avoid a credit crisis by making certain demand for USDA farm loans is satisfied. The bill also includes a pilot program aimed at reducing inequities in ARC payments and provides resources for USDA to establish a presence in Cuba to facilitate farmers’ ability to sell more food and agriculture products to the island nation.

There is no silver bullet to solve the High Plains farm crisis. Farmers have always dealt with changes in weather and volatile swings in commodity markets. However, if farmers from across the nation – cotton, livestock, wheat and rice producers included – stand shoulder-to-shoulder during the next farm bill, I’m confident we can work together to address the critical issues facing growers of every commodity.

OBITUARIES

Bradley James “Brad” Wenzl, 39, of Atchison KS died unexpectedly on Sunday, February 12, 2017 with his brother Derek and his wife Abby by his side.

Mass of Christian Burial was held Friday, February 17th, 2017 at St. Benedict’s Church. Burial followed in the St. Ann’s Cemetery, Effingham, KS.  Memorial contributions are suggested to the Wenzl Children’s Education Fund and may be sent in care of the funeral home. Condolences to the family may be left online at www.beckerdyer.com.

Brad was born on March 7, 1977 in Atchison KS the son of Dennis and Brenda (Whaley) Wenzl. He graduated from Atchison County Community High School, Effingham, KS in 1995. He attended Beloit Technical Community College and Cloud County Community College. Brad owned and operated Wenzl Construction starting in 1999. He was a member of St. Ann’s Church, Effingham, KS. He was active in the Atchison High School Booster Club for his children, and enjoyed boating, camping with their Camp A-holics, spending fun time with his family and friends. He sponsored race cars, was a Kansas City Royals, and Dallas Cowboys fan. Brad loved working for his customers and had many friends who he threw darts with, vacationed with, and had many fun times with.

He was married to the love of his life and best friend Abby Theurer on May 14, 2011. Abby survives of the home. Additional survivors include his son Parker (Wenzl) of the home, daughter, Payton (Wenzl) of the home. His parents, Dennis and Brenda Wenzl, Effingham, KS, brother Derek (Lesley) Wenzl, Cummings, KS, maternal grandfather Bob Whaley, Effingham, KS, and a number of nieces, nephews, aunts, uncles and cousins as well as a number of friends. His paternal grandparents, Lawrence & Marcella Wenzl, and maternal grandmother, Doris Whaley preceded him in death.

 

Paul Dean Cappleman, 58, of Muscotah, KS passed away unexpectedly at his home, Thursday, February 16, 2017. He was born March 17, 1958 in Horton, KS the son of Wayne and Naomi (Routh) Cappleman.

Paul graduated from ACCHS in 1976. He received his associate’s degree from Highland in 1983. He later graduated from Emporia State University in 1986 with a Bachelors Degree in Science Education and a Masters Degree in World History. He was a member of the Lakeview Faith Chapel in Holton and Pi Gamma Mu Fraternity at ESU.

He worked as a security guard at Benchmark at Topeka. When Paul moved to Emporia in 1987 he worked for Bank IV and South Side Shop 2 Shop. He also worked for Emporia University in the information booth, University Police and Safety and also Resident Assistant. He also worked in the maintenance department for Harrah’s Prairie Band Casino for 15 years.

Survivors include his parents, Wayne and Naomi Cappleman of Muscotah; a sister, Jennalee Sneden Riley (Shawn) of Holton, KS; 3 brothers, Steve Cappleman (Nancy) of Holton, KS, David Cappleman (Debbie) of Raymore, MO and Duane Cappleman of Muscotah, KS.

Funeral Services will be 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, February 21, 2017 at the Mercer Funeral Home in Holton. Burial will be in Muscotah Cemetery. The family will greet friends from 4:30 to 6:00 p.m. Monday evening at the funeral home. Memorials may be given to the Beck-Bookman Library or Lakeview Faith Chapel c/o Mercer Funeral Home, P.O. Box 270, Holton, KS 66436.

 

James Edward (Ed) Dorssom A memorial service for James Edward (ED) Dorssom, 68, Lawrence, will be 1 pm Saturday, February 25, 2017, at Rumsey-Yost Funeral Home. A visitation will take place from noon to service time.

He died February 17, 2017, at his home.

Ed was born January 6, 1949, in Atchison, KS, the son of Charles Donald and Virginia Ruth Alban Dorssom.

He graduated from Atchison County Community High School on May 23, 1967. Ed served in the United States Army from 1973-1976. He graduated from Pittsburg State University in May of 1978. After graduation Ed taught Industrial Arts at Basehor/Linwood Schools for ten years. He later went on to work in the console shop at Reuter Organ Company from 1989-2013.

Ed married Martha Valentine on August 5, 1972 in Clay Center, KS, she survives of the home.

Other survivors include his daughter Erin Roberts (Scott), Lawrence; two sons Charles Dorssom (Ashley), Manhattan, KS, Adam Dorssom, Lawrence; four brothers Harold Dorssom (Lou Ann), Lincoln, NE, Bob Dorssom (Freda), Lancaster, KS, Dave Dorssom (Dyna), Warrensburg, MO, Steve Dorssom (Joyce), Praire Village, KS; one sister Mary McQuillen (Roy), Smithville, MO; seven grandchildren Ryan, Jackson, Luke, Henry Roberts, Stella, Vera, James Dorssom.

He is preceded in death by his parents.

In lieu of flowers the family suggests memorial contributions made to LMH Oncology Department or Grace Hospice, sent in care of Rumsey-Yost Funeral Home, 601 Indiana Street, Lawrence, KS 66044.

William Lloyd “Bill” Cameron, 70, of Lancaster, KS died Tuesday, February 14, 2017 at Mosiac Health Center, St. Joseph, MO.

Funeral services will be 2:00 pm on Saturday, February 18th, 2017 at the Becker-Dyer-Stanton Funeral Home with Rev. Jim Cormode officiating. The body will be cremated following the service and private family interment of cremated remains will be at a later date in the Lancaster Cemetery. The family will receive friends from 6:00 to 8:00 pm on Friday, February 17th, 2017 at the Becker-Dyer-Stanton Funeral Home. Memorial contributions are suggested to Benedictine College or the American Cancer Society and may be sent in care of the funeral home. Condolences to the family may be left online at www.beckerdyer.com.

Bill was born on November 17, 1946 in Kansas City, KS the son of John and Betty (Jones) Cameron. He graduated from Atchison County Community High School in 1964. Bill served four years in the U.S. Coast Guard serving in Corpus Christi, TX and in Connecticut. He worked for his parents in the Lancaster Grocery and Locker for a many years. Bill retired in December, 2016 following 23 years of maintenance work for Blair Milling, Atchison. He was a member of the Lancaster United Methodist Church, the Dairy Herd Improvement Association, where he did testing of milk. Bill was especially involved and proud of his children and grandchildren, attending as much of their activities and sporting events as possible. Bill loved horses and could do any and everything associated with horses. He also enjoyed bowling, watching television, playing slow pitch baseball, and was an avid Benedictine and University of Kansas sports fan. He didn’t know a stranger, and could talk with anyone.

He was married to “Lin” Linda Pennington on February 8, 1971 in Miami, OK. She survives of the home. Additional survivors include three daughters, Lori Stafford, Atchison, KS, Daisha (Dean) Miller, Atchison, KS, and Donae (Mike) Pierce, Horton, KS, two sisters Bonnie Cameron and Mary Liggett, both of Atchison, KS, seven grandchildren, Lyra and Trey Scheid, Taylor Layfield, Matthew, Andrew and Caleb Miller and Kelsey (Derek) Barnett and two great grandchildren, Aerilyn Layfield and Rilynn Barnett. His parents, grandson Nicholas Miller, and granddaughter Elizabeth Scheid, preceded him in death.

 

GOVERNMENTAL NEWS

LEGISLATURE PASSES MASSIVE TAX INCREASE

I have heard people say “elections have consequences”. That saying played out in Topeka this week. Many new Representatives and Senators told their voters they would do whatever it took to close the budget shortfalls. Evidently that meant raising individual income tax by 1.47 billion dollars over the next five years and 964 million on businesses during that same time period (if they remain in Kansas). While those figures may not be exact, anyone can see this is the largest tax increase in our great states history. Oh, and by the way, this is just the beginning as Substitute for HB2178 did nothing to close the budget gap for FY2017 which ends this June 30th.

This tax bill passed both chambers. Final action in the House was Thursday February 16th. It received 76 YES and 48 NO votes. The Senate followed suit the next day with a vote count of 22 YES and 18 NO.  It will go most likely reach the Governor’s desk by The 21st or 22nd and he will have 10 days to sign it into law or VETO the bill and send it back to the House of Representatives. If he chooses to VETO the bill, the House will vote to override the veto. It takes 84 votes to override the Governor’s veto. If the bill does not get the required 84 votes, the veto is upheld and the bill dies. If the House has 84 votes to override the bill it then goes to the Senate. The Senate must have 27 votes to override the Governor or the bill dies. I voted NO and have no intention of changing my vote.

The following is my explanation of vote that is part of the permanent record: MR SPEAKER: Sub HB 2178 increases taxes on individuals to the tune of 1.4 billion dollars in the next 5 years. To say nothing of the 967-million-dollar bill on small business owners (if they stay in Kansas). Those pass-through entities accounted for 82% of the 36,000 private sector jobs created in years 2013 and 2014. I hope at some point this body will address the lost revenue due to sales tax exemptions which cost the state over 6 billion dollars a year. When will we truly address the issue of fairness in our tax code? Mr. Speaker I vote NO on Sub HB 2178. – RANDY GARBER  

For those who think the government is the answer, you will not be happy with me. However, for those who believe the government should be more frugal and accountable with the hard-earned money they take out of your pocket, you will be happy with my vote.

 The 2012 tax cuts are working, but some of the main drivers of our economy have not performed as they do historically. These being Gas & Oil, Aeronautics and Agriculture. When they were asked, the number of Kansans who think the income tax should be increased on Kansas citizens was 4%. The state business tax climate rating went from 35th in 2011 to 22nd in 2016 because of the 2012 tax reforms. We should stay the course in that area. Ronald Reagan said: “The problem is not that the people are taxed too little; the problem is that government spends too much.”

I can be reached at randy.garber@house.ks.gov or my cell: 785-285-1238. Until the next time, may the blessings of God be yours.

EFFINGHAM COUNCIL MINUTES JAN. 4, 2017

COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT WERE:  DAVID LOWE, MARK HURST, KIRK KLOEPPER AND TODD ECKERT.  KIRK WOHLGEMTH, PRESIDENT OF THE COUNCIL PRESIDED OVER THE MEETING IN THE ABSENCE OF THE MAYOR.  THE MEETING WAS CALLED TO ORDER AT 7:00 P.M.

Kloepper moved to accept the minutes of the previous meeting as written.  Eckert seconded the motion.  The motion carried unanimously.

Hurst moved to approve and pay the bills.  Lowe seconded the motion.  The motion carried unanimously.

Derek Faught was present and asked the council to adjust his water bill.  They had a leak that ran for quite awhile before they discovered it.  Eckert moved to lower Faught’s water bill by half.  Lowe seconded the motion.  The motion carried unanimously.

Dennis Haug of Haug Communications was present regarding his company’s lease of the water tower .  Angie Kreider of Rainbow Communications was also present to address Haug’s concerns as well as any the City might have.  Rainbow provides only email service to 7 city residents.  In the future, they will be trying to increase their customer base here.  Haug claims that Rainbow’s use of the tower is interfering with his ability to provide internet service in the area.  Krider pointed out the it is not unusual for more than one provider to utilize the same tower.  They just need to work together on the frequencies they use so they do not interfere with each other.  Haug indicated that he has had some communication with Rainbow but the problem still exists.  The council asked that the two companies get together and work out this problem without city involvement and that they report back at the next meeting on their progress.

Keith Taliaferro and Jim Ryser of the Atchison County Fair Association told the council that the Fair Board is working to increase attendance and participation in the annual county fair.  They would like to have a beer garden on the fairgrounds if the city does not have a problem with that.  The have hired a larger carnival and will be needing more lighting in the park.  They asked if the city could help with that expense.  The council indicated that they do not have a problem with the beer garden if it is contained and patrolled.  The city will work with the fair board to get prices on adding and improving the lighting in  the park. 

City Superintendent, Jimmy Ellis gave his report to the council.  He has just finished getting well #5 acidized and it is running much more efficiently.  This is something we need to do on a regular basis in the future.  He reported that the old mower has some problems and he asked the council if he should try to get it fixed or look into a new mower.  The council directed him to look into trading in the old mower and getting a new one.  We also need to start looking for a new mini-excavator.  Ours is in pretty bad shape.  He also asked about getting a different salt spreader for the truck.  The current one is shot.  The council told him to look for a different salt spreader and to list all old equipment on Purple Wave for sale.

City Attorney, Leonard Buddenbohm informed the council that the structural inspection of the Ted McCoy property at 701 William Street has been completed.  The report states that the structure is unsafe due to the foundation and it must razed or replaced.  Buddenbohm told the council that the hearing will not be in January.  Fresh and McCoy are trying to work something out without a trial.  Buddenbohm has told them that the city stands by the report and the foundation of the house must be repaired to meet building standards and codes or it must be razed. 

Buddenbohm reported that our Municipal Judge, John Kurth, has resigned.  He has contacted Rick Johnson of Valley Falls and he would be willing to take the job if the council approves and appoints him.  Eckert moved to appoint Rick Johnson as Judge of the Municipal Court.  Kloepper seconded the motion.  The motion carried unanimously.  A thank you note will be sent to John Kurth for his service.

Ordinance 2017-01 relating to the terms of office of election officers, the transition of those terms to the November election cycle and nomination petition requirements was considered.  Kloepper moved to require 2 signatures of the qualified electors of the City of Effingham on nomination petitions.  Eckert seconded the motion.  The motion carried unanimously.  Kloepper moved to pass Ordinance 2017-01.  Eckert seconded the motion.  The motion carried unanimously.

Resolution No 1123 exempting the city from using the Generally Accepted Accounting Procedures and allowing the city to use Cash Basis Accounting for the year ending December 31, 2017, was considered.  Eckert moved to adopt Resolution No. 1123.  Lowe seconded the motion.  The motion carried unanimously.

Kloepper moved to use the Exchange National Bank as the depository for city funds for the year 2017.  Eckert seconded the motion.  The motion carried unanimously.

Eckert moved to use the same signers for city checks for the year 2017 as for the previous year.  Lowe

 seconded the motion.  The motion carried unanimously.

Kloepper moved to adjourn the meeting.  Eckert seconded the motion.  The motion carried unanimously.  The meeting adjourned at 8:15 p.m.

Pat Strine, City Clerk

 

Unapproved Minutes of the Thursday February 16 Meeting of the Atchison County Commission

Pursuant to the law, the board met in Special Session at 1:00 PM on the 1st floor of the courthouse to address some time-sensitive issues for some department heads. Chairman Eric Noll called meeting to order with Commissioners Bill Pohl and Commissioner Jeff Schuele present for the meeting, County Clerk Michelle Phillips recorded the minutes. County Counselor Pat Henderson was present.

The Board recited the pledge of allegiance to start the meeting.

Minutes of February 7, 2017 were reviewed with no corrections noted. Commissioner Pohl made the motion to approve the minutes as read, Commissioner Schuele seconded.

Chairman Noll called for a vote, all voted aye, motion carried, 3-0.

*Reports of Elected Officials and Department Heads:

Connie Ellerman, Noxious Weed Director, appeared before the board with the Weed Management Annual Report. The annual report, required by the state, details the amount of chemicals sold, the acres treated and the number of weeds estimated in the county. This estimate of weeds is figured by physical inspection of random parcels of land throughout the county. This list of parcels is provided by the state.

Connie has been working with Seth Howard, Road and Bridge Superintendent, on a transition plan for October when he will take over the Noxious Weed Director duties.

Commissioner Pohl made a motion to accept the annual Noxious Weed Eradication Progress Report. Commissioner Pohl seconded. Chairman Noll called for a vote, all voted aye.

Motion passed 3-0.

Connie also presented the board with a purchase order for Milestone. This is a newer product but very similar to Tordon. She has been getting request from customers and this is the time of year this product is needed. This product has been purchased in the past outside of the chemical order process, and can be purchased at the same cost as last year. Commissioner Pohl made a motion to approve the purchase order for $4.245.00 payable to VDSC for 60 quarts of Milestone. Commissioner Schuele second. Chairman Noll called for a vote, all voted aye.

Motion passed 3-0.

Peggy House, Atchison Senior Village Administrator, appeared before the board with a purchase order for 22 dry fire sprinkler heads for $9,997.00. This is needed to stay in compliance with the Fire Marshall. Commissioner Schuele moved to approve the purchase order for 22 dry fire sprinkler heads payable to Jayhawk Fire Sprinkler in the amount of $9,997.00.

Commissioner Pohl seconded. Chairman Noll called for a vote, all voted aye. Motion passed 3-0.

*Executive Session:

Commissioner Schuele moved that the board of County Commissioners recess into executive session at 1:20 for consultation with an attorney for the public body which would be deemed privileged in the attorney-client relationship, as allowed by K.S.A. 75-4319 (b) (2), and that the purpose of the closed session is to protect confidentiality of the discussion, and that the Board come out of the executive session at 1:25 PM, in the commission room, 1st floor, courthouse. Those present will be the County Commissioners, County Counselor Pat Henderson and Peggy House, Atchison Senior Village Administrator. Commissioner Pohl seconded.

Chairman Noll called for a vote, all voted aye. Motion carried 3-0.

No action taken during the executive session.

*Reports of Elected Officials and Department Heads (cont.):

Seth Howard, Road and Bridge Superintendent, appeared before the board with copies of the 2016 Bridge Inspection Report from Schwab Eaton. He also provided them with a purchase order for engineering cost, to date, for the signage project in the amount of $6,761.33.

Commissioner Pohl moved to approve the purchase order payable to Schwab-Eaton in the amount of $6,761.33 for engineering services, commission Schuele seconded. Chairman Noll called for a vote, all voted aye. Motion passed 3-0.

Seth presented the board with a concern regarding the Hamm Quarry Royalties currently being received on each ton of rock sold. He is requesting the royalty dollars be put towards the Special Bridge or Highway fund instead of the general fund. Commissioner Pohl moved that the funds received from the Hamm Quarry Royalties be redirected from the general fund and be placed into the Special Bridge fund. Commissioner Schuele seconded. Chairman Noll called for a vote, all voted aye. Motion carried 3-0.

*Executive Session:

Commissioner Pohl moved that the Board of County Commissioners recess into executive session at 1:35 for consultation with an attorney for the public body which would be deemed privileged in the attorney-client relationship, as allowed by K.S.A. 75-4319 (b) (2), and that the purpose of the closed session is to protect confidentiality of the discussion, and that the Board come out of the executive session at 1:55 PM, in the commission room, 1st floor, courthouse. Those present will be the County Commissioners, County Counselor Pat Henderson and Seth Howard, Road and Bridge Superintendent. Commissioner Schuele seconded.

Chairman Noll called for a vote, all voted aye. Motion carried 3-0.

No action taken during the executive session.

County Counselor, Pat Henderson, had to leave the meeting due to a prior engagement.

*Reports of Elected Officials and Department Heads (cont.):

Corey Scott, Emergency Medical Director, appeared before the board for approval of bid specifications for publishing, and a request for bids on a remount of the 2006 ambulance with the bad motor. He feels remounting our current box on a new E450 gas, van chassis will be the most cost effective at this point since the cost would go up if we choose to go with a diesel motor or a truck chassis. If we went with the truck chassis we would not be able to remount our box and he stated our box is known to be structurally sound since it has been inspected. If staying with a van chassis the ambulance would be good for another 8 years before it will need to be replaced.

Corey is looking at a 4-6 month window, however, per the specs any successful bidder would have to provide a loaner. Corey is going to change the language of the specs to include a time limit of 6 months. Commissioner Schuele moved to accept the bids specs with Commissioner Pohl second. Chairman Noll called for a vote, all voted aye. Motion carried 3-0.

At 2:16 Commissioner Schuele moved to adjourn the meeting with Commissioner Pohl second. Chairman Noll called for a vote, all voted aye. The motion carried 3-0.  Attest: Michelle Phillips

 

Simon’s Law ~ Lt. Governor Jeff Colyer, M.D.

If you haven’t heard of Simon’s Law, it’s time you do. The Kansas legislature knows it as Senate Bill 85, but even calling it by this technical name goes against the heart of the bill. You see, at the heart of this bill is the story of a little boy named Simon who left his parents and this earth at just 3 months of age. 

Simon Crosier was born September of 2010 with a rare chromosomal syndrome known as Trisomy 18.  Few children with Trisomy 18 survive their first year of life. In Simon’s mother’s book, I Am Not a Syndrome—My Name is Simon, Sheryl Crosier describes how life-sustaining care was withheld from her son, leading to his death in December of 2010. The injustice of his death lies in this fact: life-saving care was withheld from their without the parents’ consent. Due to Simon’s Trisomy 18, a Do Not Resuscitate order (DNR) was placed in Simon’s medical file without his parents’ knowledge or authorization.  

Since the tragic loss of their son, the Crosiers have been on a mission to ensure children like Simon are not discriminated against because of their medical conditions. Simply stated, Simon’s Law would make it so no healthcare professional could withhold or restrict life-sustaining measures or authorize a DNR on a minor without a parent’s permission.

As a craniofacial surgeon, I have seen first-hand some of the most difficult situations a parent and their child can ever face. When I care for a patient who is unlikely to long survive, I am obligated to provide the best medical care and communicate realistically with parents. 

Throughout my 23 years of practicing medicine, I have had to consider each situation independently.  Each patient is a person, not a series of numbers and statistics. There have been times in my career when predictors indicated a certain outcome, yet the person’s strength and ability beat the odds, allowing them to survive and thrive. It is my job to tell parents the facts and the odds and give them my opinion because they count on my education and experience to help them decide what choices to make. It is not my role to decide a patient is not worth treating because the odds are against them.  In the end, as a doctor, I must respect that parents are best fit to make life and death decisions for their own children. 

While this legislation sounds like common sense and should be easily approved, rarely is the legislative process simple. In the years to come, history will judge our society by how we treated the most vulnerable among us. Let us take a stand and protect children like Simon. Ask your legislators to vote yes on Senate Bill 85, then tell them Simon’s story. Let us make sure his story is not repeated.  

 

2ND AMENDMENT RIGHTS DO NOT END AT THE FRONT DOOR

TOPEKA – (February 17, 2017) – Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt yesterday asked the U.S. Supreme Court to strike down a California gun restriction that prohibits citizens from carrying handguns outside their homes for self-defense.

In a brief asking the U.S. Supreme Court to review a lower court’s decision, Schmidt and the attorneys general of 25 other states argue the fundamental right to bear arms extends beyond the home. The case centers on a San Diego County gun restriction.

 “The San Diego County sheriff’s licensing scheme effectively bans the core right to bear arms for ordinary, law-abiding citizens and, consequently violates the Second Amendment,” the attorneys general wrote. “The experience of amici States demonstrates that the restrictions on bearing arms in San Diego County cannot withstand any level of scrutiny. Although the amici States share the same compelling interests in protecting the health and safety of their citizens, they have been able to do so without curtailing the fundamental right of their citizens to bear arms.”

In addition to Kansas, the other states joining the brief were Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

The case is Edward Peruta v State of California. A copy of the brief is available at http://bit.ly/2ls1Go9.

 

Sen. Moran Sponsors Bill to Spur Investment in Short Line Railroads, Boost Rural Economic Development

WASHINGTON – U.S. Senator Jerry Moran (R-Kan.) today joined Sen. Mike Crapo (R-Idaho) to introduce the Building Rail Access for Customers and the Economy (BRACE) Act (S. 407). The bipartisan legislation would further extend the short line railroad track maintenance tax credit that expired in 2014.

“Short lines matter greatly to us in Kansas,” said Sen. Moran. “It is critical for Kansas farmers and factories that we have an efficient, cost-effective way to move the commodities and goods produced in our state – and the short line railroad network fits that need. This legislation will help support large areas of the country, including many rural communities across Kansas, where short lines serve as the main connection to the national railroad network and markets far from home.”

“The team members on the South Kansas and Oklahoma Railroad, Kansas and Oklahoma Railroad, Kaw River Railroad, and our Pittsburg headquarters staff come to work every day to focus on the needs of Kansas farmers, cement plants, as well as coal, chemical, steel and plastics shippers,” said Watco Companies Chief of Global Strategy Ed McKechnie. “Sen. Moran’s tireless efforts in support of rural transportation for more than a decade now to build an enormous bipartisan coalition – first in the House and now in the Senate –have made tremendous impacts. We appreciate his leadership and we will continue to put our customers first and invest in Kansas infrastructure with the support of this important bill.”Hoffman

The tax credit was established by legislation introduced by then-Rep. Jerry Moran in 2004 to encourage railroads, railroad customers and suppliers – who depend the most on short line railroads – to invest directly in maintaining the more than 2,000 miles of short line rails in Kansas. Located in the center of America’s heartland, Kansas is one of the leading rail and distribution centers in our country and plays an integral role connecting farmers and factories with communities around the globe. The short line railroad track maintenance credit provides short line and regional railroads a 50 percent tax credit for railroad track maintenance expenses, up to $3,500 per mile of track owned or leased by the railroad.

In addition to Sens. Crapo and Moran, S. 407 is cosponsored by Sens. Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.), Pat Roberts (R-Kan.), Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), Jonny Isakson (R-Ga.), Bob Casey (D-Pa.) Roger Wicker (R-Miss.), Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.), James Inhofe (R-Okla.) and Ron Wyden (D-Ore.). Companion legislation was introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives by Rep. Lynn Jenkins (R-KS-02).

 

Sen. Moran, Colleagues Urge HHS Secretary to Prioritize Rural Healthcare

WASHINGTON – U.S. Senator Jerry Moran (R-Kan.) joined U.S. Senators Roger Wicker (R-Miss.) and Jon Tester (D-Mont.) in calling on the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Tom Price to prioritize healthcare in rural America.

 “Access to healthcare in Kansas and small communities across the country is critical to the survival of rural America,” Sen. Moran said. “I am hopeful the new administration will recognize the unique challenges facing providers in rural areas and make certain policies are put in place that enhance, rather than impede their efforts in providing quality care. During my visits to hospitals across the state, I have had the opportunity to learn more about how they prioritize resources to deliver the best possible care, and I am optimistic that Sec. Price will keep their needs in mind.”

In a letter, the senators emphasize the importance of rural healthcare providers and their critical role in rural communities. The letter reads, in part, “As you take on this new leadership role at HHS, we request that you work with us to ensure that the federal government does not act as an impediment to providing health care in rural communities. Overreaching and onerous regulations from Washington disproportionately harm rural America. We believe that together we can enact and implement effective policies that help providers innovate in care delivery and enable them to make efficient use of available resources.”

Nationally, more than 80 rural hospitals have closed in recent years. Some estimates show another 700 rural hospitals are at risk of closure.

Sen. Moran is a member of the Senate Health Appropriations Subcommittee.

Click here to read the letter in full.

 

Sen. Moran Seeks Release of American Pastor Detained in Turkey

WASHINGTON – U.S. Senator Jerry Moran (R-Kan.) joined a bipartisan group of members of Congress focused on issues of religious freedom to urge Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan to grant the unconditional release of American Pastor Andrew Brunson, who has been unjustly detained in Turkey since October and denied regular and appropriate access to legal counsel and American consular services.

“Turkey’s treatment of Pastor Brunson appears to be in direct violation of the fundamental freedoms of religion and speech, which are enshrined in the Constitutions of both the United States and Turkey,” said Sen. Moran. “President Erdoğan should end the wrongful imprisonment of Pastor Brunson and allow him to return to his family in North Carolina. Political disagreements must be put to rest when the universal human rights of religious freedom and freedom of speech are at stake. I would expect any of our nation’s allies to do the same.”

During his time in the Senate, Sen. Moran has been a steadfast defender of religious freedom whether under threat at home – like in the Zubik v. Burwell U.S. Supreme Court case – or abroad as when he advocated for the release of Pastor Saeed Abedini.

Please find below the full letter.

 

Dear President Erdoğan,

We write to request that Mr. Andrew Brunson, an American citizen who has been unjustly detained in Turkey, be immediately released and deported.

Mr. Brunson has worked peacefully in Turkey since 1993. There appears to be no evidence to substantiate the charges against him for membership in an armed terrorist organization. Moreover, your government has repeatedly denied regular and appropriate access to legal counsel and American consular services.

Mr. Brunson’s imprisonment has been raised repeatedly by U.S. Government officials with officials of the Government of Turkey. Unfortunately, high-level efforts to secure Mr. Brunson’s release have been unsuccessful. We have closely followed developments with this case, and are deeply disappointed.

The United States and Turkey have benefited from a close partnership for decades, and we hope to be in a position to continue strengthening these ties. Now is the time for our countries to reaffirm respect for fundamental freedoms and the rule of law while reasserting our shared commitment to addressing security challenges through partnerships and cooperation.

In this spirit of partnership, we respectfully ask you to consider Mr. Brunson’s case and how the recent treatment of Mr. Brunson places significant strain not only on him and his family, but also on the robust bilateral relationship between the United States and Turkey.

We appeal to you to inquire as to the options for promptly deporting Mr. Brunson and to act on them expeditiously.

A copy of the letter is available here.

 

AG Derek Schmidt to Kansas congressional delegation: Please help ‘get the state’s money back’

TOPEKA – (February 16, 2017) – Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt yesterday asked for help from the Kansas congressional delegation to  repeal two taxes unlawfully imposed on the State of Kansas by the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and to obtain a refund of the state’s payments made to date.

Kansas has sued the federal government over the Health Insurance Provider Fee, which is one of the two taxes. That case, State of Texas, et al. v. United States of America, et al., remains pending in federal district court in Texas.  To date, the State of Kansas has paid $90,065,692.00 in taxes to the federal government. Kansas also has led a 13-state coalition objecting to the “transitional reinsurance program,” which was designed to apply a tax on state government health plans like that of Kansas. That case, State of Ohio, et al., v. United States of America, et al., is currently pending decision in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit. To date, Kansas has paid $9,130,700.14 in transitional reinsurance taxes.

 “Kansas maintains that these attempts by the federal government to commandeer state taxing power – in effect, to tax the states – is both unlawful and unconstitutional,” Schmidt wrote in the letter to the state’s congressional delegation. “I am prepared to continue to litigate these cases to their conclusion, and if we are successful, to recover the funds Kansas was unlawfully compelled to pay. However, because Congress is preparing to reconsider portions of the ACA, a preferable outcome would be for Congress to require a full refund of the funds paid under [the two taxes] by Kansas and others that have challenged the taxes.”

The total amount paid so far to the federal government by Kansas under these two taxes is $99,196,392.14. Schmidt said the first priority for Congress should be to end future collection of these taxes before the State of Kansas is required to make any further payments. The next state payment of the transitional reinsurance tax is due November 17, 2017, and the next Health Insurance Provider Fee payment will come due in 2018.

 “Kansas has important state-level priorities for which our citizens pay state taxes,” Schmidt said. “State taxes are not intended to fund the operations of the federal government, but that is what has happened with these two unlawful taxes imposed on Kansas by the ACA. We’re asking for that to end, and we’re asking for help in getting the state’s money back.”

A copy of Schmidt’s letter is available at http://bit.ly/2kCIFvv.

 

MISCELLANEOUS PRESS RELEASES

March 6th Workshop to discuss Conservation Plantings

Conservation plantings (e.g. riparian forest buffers, grass filter strips, streambank revegetation, prairie and wetland restoration, agroforestry, cover crops) can provide multiple benefits for agricultural producers. A producer workshop will be held on March 6, 2017, in Brown County to provide information on the uses and benefits of conservation plantings and programs to assist producers. The workshop will feature presentations by resource professionals and producers on multiple practices and projects. An afternoon field trip will provide an opportunity to observe installed practices. There is no charge for the workshop, which will be held at the Bingo Hall, Golden Eagle Casino (West Entrance), 1121 Goldfinch Road west of Horton, KS. Lunch will be provided if reservations are received by noon on February 27th. Registration opens at 8:30 a.m. with presentations beginning at 9:00 a.m. For more information and to make reservations, call 785-284-3422 or email watershed@delawarewraps.com. The workshop is sponsored by the Delaware River Watershed Restoration and Protection Strategy (WRAPS) Program.

 

From the Land of Kansas and Farmers’ Market Event Registration Opens

MANHATTAN, Kan. ­­— The From the Land of Kansas Annual Meeting and Farmers’ Market Conference will be held March 16-17, 2017, in Manhattan. The conference includes the annual meeting for members, partners and farmers’ markets. It will feature general sessions, specialized workshops and a wholesale trade show for all attendees. This year’s theme, “Focus on our Future,” embraces how members from the trademark program and farmers’ market groups can learn to make their companies and programs more successful.

“The annual meeting is an opportunity to network with other Kansas entrepreneurs in the ag industry,” said Jackie McClaskey, Kansas Secretary of Agriculture. “In addition, sessions will cover a diversity of topics and presentations by experts in the industry for continued learning and growth.”

The keynote speaker will be Jon Schallert, destination business expert, whose presentation will focus on reinventing businesses into consumer destinations. Participants in the conference and trade show also will be able to hear from other experts in the agriculture, marketing and food industries. Topics which will be featured in sessions and workshops include:

·                     Small business marketing

·                     Successfully coordinating, managing and sustaining a farmers’ market

·                     Food industry updates

To register or learn more about the conference, visit FromtheLandofKansas.com/AMeeting. This event is sponsored by Network Kansas; Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism; Hy-Vee; Kansas Center for Sustainable Agriculture and Alternative Crops; Manhattan Area Chamber of Commerce Economic Development; Kansas Association of Conservation Districts; Marion County Economic Development; Visit Manhattan; and Pottawatomie County Economic Development.

From the Land of Kansas is the state’s agriculture trademark program in the Kansas Department of Agriculture. The program works to promote and support Kansas farmers, ranchers and agribusinesses that grow, raise or manufacture agriculture products or products for agriculture use. KDA is committed to its mission to help make Kansas businesses more successful, grow rural communities and expand markets for Kansas agricultural products.

 If you have questions, please contact Janelle Dobbins, From the Land of Kansas marketing manager, at 785-564-6759 or Janelle.Dobbins@ks.gov. To learn more about From the Land of Kansas, become a From the Land of Kansas member, or find local Kansas food, products or services, visit FromtheLandofKansas.com.

WILDLIFE AND PARKS REPORTS

Kansas Wildlife, Parks And Tourism Gets New Licensing System

PRATT – In late February, the computer license sales and reservation system the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism (KDWPT) has used for many years will be no more. A new and improved system, provided by Active Network, will go into full operation. Active Network has provided the software and point-of-sale hardware for 11 years that allowed KDWPT to accept campsite and cabin reservations and sell licenses online, maintaining all license records electronically. That contract expired and a new contract, with some changes, is now in place.

License buyers and campers won’t notice a big difference; however, the current license sales system will shut down at 9:45 p.m. on Feb. 18, and the new system will be online at 8 a.m. on Feb. 22. No license or permit sales will be available through the system for roughly three days. The campsite and cabin reservation system will shut down at 12:01 a.m., Feb. 20 and go back online at 6 p.m., Feb. 21.

While it may be inconvenient for anyone who tries to buy a license or make a reservation during the downtime, this time is important to allow data to be transferred, configurations to be completed and to ensure everything is working properly before going live. The new system will retain the KDWPT numbers of everyone who purchased a hunting or fishing license in the old system, and there will be no changes in pricing.

The new system will provide some advantages to users, including allowing customers to purchase hunting and fishing licenses at the same time they make camping or cabin reservations. It will allow customers to reprint licenses within 48 hours if they were unable to print during the transaction. Other features include allowing customers to browse available licenses and permits before they make a purchase, buy licenses or permits for multiple years when available (such as buying a 2017 hunting license and a 2016 HIP stamp) and logging in with an email address to edit personal information on record such as address and phone number.

One significant change with the new system involves permits that have carcass tags attached, such as deer, turkey, elk, and antelope, which could have been purchased from home and printed out on a desktop printer under the old system. This caused many issues for Law Enforcement since there was no way to prohibit someone from printing multiple carcass tags with one permit. In the new system, permits with carcass tags will have to be purchased and issued through a license agent or over the phone, in which case the permit/carcass tag will be mailed to the customer.

 

Light Goose Conservation Order Open Now

PRATT — Waterfowl hunting addicts may be having withdrawals since the duck seasons closed on Jan. 29 and regular goose seasons closed Feb. 12. But they will find temporary relief in the Light Goose Conservation Order, which is open Feb. 13-April 30, 2017. In an effort to reduce the population of snow and Ross’ geese, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) authorized this special hunting season for light geese.

To increase hunter success, the conservation order authorizes hunting methods not allowed during the regular seasons, including the use of electronic calls and unplugged shotguns. Extended shooting hours are one-half hour before sunrise to one-half hour after sunset. And there is no daily bag or possession limits.

The conservation order was first established in 1999 when it was determined that the population of light geese had increased more than 300 percent since the mid-1970s. Extraordinary numbers of geese have denuded portions of their fragile tundra breeding habitat in the arctic, which may take decades to recover. And the damage is impacting other bird species that nest there, including semi-palmated sandpipers and red-necked phalaropes.

For more information on this season, visit www.ksoutdoors.com and click on “Hunting/When to Hunt/Migratory Birds.”

 

National Fish and Wildlife Foundation Grant to Benefit Lesser Prairie Chickens

PRATT – The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) has awarded a grant to the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (WAFWA) to restore lesser prairie chicken habitat. The $197,309.25 grant is funded through NFWF’s ConocoPhillips SPIRIT of Conservation and Innovation Program.

“We appreciate our partnership with NFWF and ConocoPhillips and look forward to applying these funds as we continue to implement the Lesser Prairie Chicken Rangewide Plan,” said Alexa Sandoval, Director of the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish and Chairman of the Lesser Prairie Chicken Initiative Council. “Restoration work is key to the long-term survival of the bird and this grant will contribute to the combined efforts to keep the bird off the endangered species list.”

The bird was listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act in 2014, but was de-listed in 2016 after a federal judge ruled on a lawsuit and vacated the listing. The judge ruled that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service did not thoroughly consider active conservation efforts in making the listing decision, namely the activities associated with WAFWA’s Lesser Prairie Chicken Rangewide Plan. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is currently reviewing the status of the lesser prairie chicken across its five-state range to determine whether it should be listed again.

The NFWF grant will fund restoration work on up to 1,000 acres of private land that will connect larger fragmented pieces of prairie chicken habitat. Good habitat must be contiguous to benefit lesser prairie chickens.

“The rangewide plan calls for us to focus our efforts as strategically as possible,” said Bill Van Pelt, WAFWA Grassland Coordinator. “By connecting good bird habitat, more acreage will be available for the birds to thrive.”

The rangewide plan is a collaborative effort of WAFWA and the state wildlife agencies of Kansas, Colorado, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas. It was developed to ensure conservation of the lesser prairie chicken by providing a mechanism for voluntary cooperation by landowners and industry, and improving coordination between state and federal conservation agencies. Funding for WAFWA’s conservation efforts comes from voluntary mitigation payments by industry partners that are enrolled in the plan, along with grants from partners like NFWF. The plan allows agriculture producers and industry to continue operations while reducing impacts to the bird and its grassland habitat.

For more info on NFWF’s ConocoPhillips SPIRIT of Conservation and Innovation Program, visit www.nfwf.org/spirit/Pages/home.aspx

 

HISTORY IS FUN ~ Robert D. Caplinger

Old news from the 1946 Issues of Effingham New Leaf

CORMODE  -  HAWK WEDDING.          "A wedding characterized by simplicity took place Thursday evening, February 14, at 7 o'clock, when Miss Wilma Jane Cormode became the bride of Wilson Smith Hawk.

"The candle lighted ceremony took place in the living room at the spacious country home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Cormode.

"Her younger sister and only attendant Miss Sara Kay Cormode was bride's maid.  The groom's cousin, Robert Hawk acted as best man.

"Mrs. Hawk was an apt student at the Cain school and graduated with honors at ACCHS with the Class of '43.  After graduation she was employed in the office of the Blair Milling Company in Atchison, when she was persuaded by Prin. Frank Hunn to be his private secretary at ACCHS.  This position she still retains under Prin. J. Frank Nugent and will continue until the close of school.

"The bridegroom graduated in the class of '40.  Later he completed the Decatur Indiana Auction College and he followed the profession of auctioneer until he was called to the armed service in November '42.  Mr. Hawk received several awards for meritorious service.  Dec. 8, 1945, he received his discharge and again took up his profession.

"After the reception, Mr. and Mrs. Hawk left for a wedding trip to Nebraska to visit relatives.  After their return, they will go to housekeeping in a home in Effingham."

HISTORY FROM THE OBITUARY OF CHARLES ELLSON.    "Charles Ellson, 76, one of Muscotah's most prominent citizens and merchants died Tuesday, Jan. 15. 

"Born in Avon, Ohio, February 13, 1869, Mr. Ellson was the last surviving member of immediate family.  The death of his brother, John Ellson, occurred last June.

"Fifty-four years ago, July 8, 1891, he married Miss Augusta Lyon of Muscotah, who with three children survive.

"Charles Ellson went to work for his father and brother John in the Muscotah meat market in 1881, when he was 12 years old.  At 17, he hauled the first load of meat to the new town of Horton, when it was incorporated 60 years ago, and he has seen all the developments in this corner of Kansas since that time.

"He later went into partnership with his father, finally taking over the business upon his father's death.  His son, Ralph, was juvenile partner in the firm four years, but ill health forced him to change climate.

"When a young man "Butch" as he was familiarly known was an employee of the late Henry Woodard meat market in Effingham, where he made many lasting friends.

"The past 60 years, he had been in the meat and grocery business in Muscotah and here too his friends were legion.

"He served his customers, honestly, faithfully and efficiently until his health failed completely and he was forced to retire.

"Last January, he sold his business to his son-in-law, Hans Lassen, who with his son, Ralph, has lived with Mr. and Mrs. Ellson, since the death of Mrs. Lassen."

WHEN CAN AUCTIONEERS USE THE TITLE "COLONEL"?

According to a New Leaf article:  "Wilson Hawk and Roy Morgan were auctioneers for Earl Coder's sale, Tuesday.  It is a conceded rule that auctioneers have to conduct 1000 sales before they can claim the title of "Colonel."  The late B. F. Wallack, and C. A. Hawk of Effingham, and the late John Daum of Nortonville, attached the prefix to their names after a good many years in the auction business.  Hawk and Morgan will also probably attain the goal."

FUNK  -  KELLY WEDDING.  "An impressive wedding ceremony was solemnized last Wednesday morning at St. Benedicts church, in Atchison, when Miss Rosemary Funk, daughter of Mrs. Minnie C. Funk of Winchester, became the bride of Mr. Bernard Kelly, son of Mr. and Mrs. Martin Kelly of Effingham.  The Rev. Albert Haverkamp, O.S.B. officiated at the nuptial mass.

"The bride, a brunette, was lovely in her gown of wedding ring satin.  Miss Irene Funk was her sister's bridesmaid.

"Paul Kelly was his brother's best man.

"After a brief honeymoon the young couple will be at home on a farm in the Mooney Creek community."

EFFINGHAM'S HOTEL.  "Effingham's hotel that was built around 50 years ago by T. F. Cook, father of Mrs. Frank Sutter and Mrs. ED Kaufman of Effingham, is being razed.

"Effingham was always noted for a good hotel.  The original hotel that operated before this one was known far and wide throughout the country and was conducted  by Aunt Betty Benton , a good cook, who not only gave her guests good things to eat, but made of her hotel a favorite stopping place for the traveling public on account of the hospitable way in which she ran it.

"Uncle Jack Martin succeeded Aunt Betty and for many years kept up the high standard set by her.  His daughter, Mrs. Henry Woodard, mother of Mrs. Rollo Taliaferro, was another whose cooking 'just hit the spot' with home folks.

"Mr. and Mrs. Cook, who built the brick building by their kindly welcome and delicious meals made friends for them, the  hundreds of visitors that came to Effingham from year to year, and who never left the hotel without a full meal.  The Cooks were succeeded by their daughter, now Mrs. Frank Sutter, and as good a cook as her beloved mother.

"Around 38 years ago, Mrs. Davis, took over the management of the hotel and she maintained the high standard of food and hospitality set by her ancestors.  She was ably assisted by her daughter, Alice, now Mrs. J. E. Stewart.

"Others in line were Ira Graves and Henry Glaspey.  Their wives were also excellent cooks.  However, the automobile scene  came, traveling men and tourists could then make large towns with modern conveniences and the hotel business in Effingham became extinct.

"Snowden Barnett, who recently purchased the building and is having it razed, plans to build a garage on the lots."

NEWS ITEMS OF MEN & WOMEN IN THE SERVICE

"Robert Reece, S 2-c of the navy, son of the Ira Reeces, has received his discharge at Norman, Oklahoma.  He served 29 months in the Pacific area."

"Stephen Speer, of Atchison, formerly of Muscotah, has been discharged from the service."

"Lyle Bolinger has been discharged from overseas duty and is expected home tomorrow."

"One of the happiest young men in Effingham is Edgar McNeil.  After 3 years of service he has his discharge and plans to complete his college course, either at Kansas State or the University of Kansas.  Edgar has nice offers from the athletic department of both schools."

"Capt. J. R. Foster is on his way home from overseas."

"Pvt. Clarke Walton, of Ft. Leavenworth spent a 24 hour furlough with his mother, Mrs. Fred Walton, in Muscotah."

 

CLASSIFIED ADS

St. Louis Youth Group Spaghetti Lunch - Sunday, March 5 2017 at the St. Louis Parish basement from 11:30-1:00 pm.  All proceeds help fund the Youth Program

  City of Effingham is accepting applications for Swimming Pool Manager until 3:00 p.m. on Tuesday, February 28, 2017.  Applicants must have current certifications or be pursuing certification in CPR and First-Aid.  Lifeguarding certification preferred. Application and job description are available at the City Office, 414 Main Street, 913-833-4471.  EOE

 

"GUESS WHO"

Can you identify the place, persons or year in this photo? Last issue was  Glenn Nichols on graduation day at K-State with daughter Pat.

 

 LAST WEEK

 

  Problems with this web site contact cap@thenewsleaf.com Last updated 2-21-2017

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