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You are our   Visitor

 

The September 17, 2019

 Edition

of

The Newsleaf

Vol. 16  Issue 38

BETWEEN THE ISSUES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ALL AROUND US

2019 Homecoming Approaches

The candidates for ACCHS 2019 Homecoming Royalty candidates were announced this last week.  Those vying for Queen are: Victoria Caplinger, daughter of Courtney and Chris Caplinger; Annie Hall, daughter of Jenna and Josh Hall; and Sarah Kimmi, daughter of Angie and Gene Kimmi. King candidates are Ryan Dunn, brother of Mark Zeltner and Casey Stirton; Trystin Myers, son of Rachel Madden and Cindy and Scott Myers; and Tucker Smith, son of Lisa and Trever Smith. The crowning ceremony will take place at 6:30 p.m. on Friday, September 20, 2019, at Tiger Stadium, prior to the football game between ACCHS and Valley Heights.

 

Left to right: Sarah Kimmi, Tucker Smith, Victoria Caplinger, Trystin Myers, Annie Hall, and Ryan Dunn.

USD 377 SCHOOL NEWS

Paws Patrol ~ Tannah Forbes

Welcome back to this week's edition of the Paws Patrol. This week’s will include Homecoming, updates on Tiger Sports, and we will start Senior Spotlights. 

Homecoming week starts today and will end on Saturday with the Homecoming dance. King and Queen candidates will be announced at 6:00 pm on Friday. The annual bonfire will also be held after the football game to the east of the football field. 

The 2019 Theme for Homecoming is “Be Proud.” The festivities are as follows. 

Monday- Proud of My Background--Redneck, Country, Hillbilly, Farmer, Rural America, etc. 

Tuesday-Proud of our Alumni -- favorite college shirts, fraternity dress, etc. 

Wednesday-Proud of our Country--Patriotic dress 

Thursday-Proud of my Class --Class colors  (Seniors: Blue, Juniors: Green, Sophomores: Pink, Freshman: White, Eighth grade: Yellow, Seventh grade: Purple, Staff: Black.)  

Friday-  Proud to be a Tiger. There will be a community pep assembly to be held at the stadium starting around 2:35 pm.

Monday 9/09, JH volleyball traveled to JCN to play against Maur Hill. The scores were 26-24, 18-25, 8-15 and against Jefferson County North scores were 18-25 and 15-25. HS JV football played Oskaloosa at home and came away with a victory of 38-0.

Tuesday 9/10, Varsity Volleyball players traveled to Valley Falls. Horton defeated  ACCHS 21-25, 25-17 25-22. The Tigers also played Valley Falls with final scores of 19-25 and 22-25. Junior Varsity played Horton, beating  ACCHS 32-30 and 25-11.  ACCHS then defeated Valley falls 28-26 and 25-17.

Thursday 9/12,  ACC Cross Country athletes traveled to Holton. Senior Victoria Caplinger placed 3rd for the Girls Varsity division, Freshman Haeden Forbes placed 1st in the JV Boys division and 8th grader Renay Myers placed 5th in her division. Junior high volleyball played at home vs St. Benedict's Catholic School. A team was defeated 25-22, 27-29, and 15-12.  B team was defeated 25-15 and 25-19. C team was defeated 25-10 and 25- 20. Junior high football was scheduled to play at home against St. Benedicts Catholic School however the rain pushed that game back. It’s rescheduled for this evening. 

Friday 9/13, HS Tiger football hosted Jackson Heights. The Tigers were not able to bring home the win although they fought hard. 

This week’s Senior Spotlight is Ian Postma and Liberty Sterling.

Ian is the son of Kristy O’Berg and Adam Postma. Ian has two nicknames, either “Thotamus” or “Hippothotamus.” His favorite food is honey chicken. Ian’s favorite color is purple. Ian’s favorite teacher is Mrs. Poe because “she’s the school mom.” Ian was recently accepted into Northwest Missouri college where he will attend after graduation. He plans to study Animation or Graphic design. The one thing about Ian that not many know is that he likes to do Wood Working. Ian would like to leave his parking spot to underclassman Payton Wagner so he can back into someone, too. 

Liberty Sterling is the daughter of Ta-Talinda Bain and granddaughter of Darlene and Lynn Moore. Liberty’s nickname is Ali or Libby. Her favorite food is Teriyaki Chicken. Mrs. Fleetwood is Liberty’s favorite teacher because, “she was there for me.” After graduation Liberty plans to go to cosmetology school. The event she is most looking forward to this year is her birthday on July 2, 2020. One fact most don’t know about Liberty is that she loves planting flowers. Liberty’s favorite saying is, “Just keep smiling.” Liberty would like to leave one of her pineapple decorations to Tyler Bichel so he will always remember her.  Liberty thinks that Ryan Dunn is the class clown because he sees someone sad and does something funny to make them laugh.

 

MUSCOTAH NEWS ~ Susan Higley

The Outreach committee met on Tuesday, September 10th. Dolly Wilson, president, called the meeting to order. Susan Higley, treasurer, gave a brief summary of the finances for 2019 with a checking account balance of $798.16. Also present were Debbie Liggatt, Carolyn Wilson, Deanna Higley and Shelly Lowe.  It was decided to welcome the new residents,  Don and Pearlene Rew,  to Muscotah by purchasing a pretty fall mum. The  Rews  purchased and are moved into Helen Hamon’s house. They moved here from Big Lake, Missouri, where they had been flooded out several times.  Dolly will pick up the mum. It was also decided to have a Senior Citizen Supper on Sunday, October 13th at 5 p.m. at the Community Building. The menu will include fried chicken, potatoes, gravy, vegetables, salads and dessert. All those over 50 are welcome to attend. If your spouse is over 50 but you aren’t,  don’t worry, you can come along. It will be an evening with good food and visiting with friends.  This is a free supper to honor our senior citizens and is a long standing activity sponsored by the Outreach.  It was also decided to spend up to $50 on candy for Trunk or Treat to be held at the park on Saturday, October 26th from 6 to 8 p.m.  Several Outreach members will decorate their car trunks and participate. Susan will pick up the candy for the event.

The Half Century club met Monday, September 9th for their monthly dinner. Those in attendance enjoyed a wonderful dinner with great desserts. The next monthly dinner will be Monday, October 7th at noon. Remember if you are 50 or over please come and enjoy the lunch and fellowship. Bring a covered dish if you can, but there is always plenty to eat.

Notice – The Cancer Support Bingo will be cancelled for this month. The next bingo will be Saturday, October 19th from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Community Building.

Sounds like another warm week and here it is the last half of September. I am sure it will change one of these days. Noticed on our way to Fairview Saturday that corn shelling has begun.  Hope everyone has a great week ahead and don’t turn off those air conditioners just yet.

NEK Garden Tractor Results

It was a bit windy but a great day for a garden tractor pull in Fairview. The following are the results:

800 lb.

1st-Sarah Hobbie             128’.48” @ 2.6 mph

2nd-Phyllis LeRow          120’ 9.84” @ 2.3 mph

3rd-Betty Niehus             119’ 6.60” @ 3.6 mph

900 lb.

1st-Sarah Hobbie             140’ 11.64” @ 3.0 mph

2nd-Jeff Niehus                         139’ 10.8” @ 2.6 mph

1000 lb.

1st-Mike Mellenbruch               141’ 9/48” @ 3.6 mph

2nd-Ed Higley                           137’ 11.76” @ 3.5 mph

3rd-Phyllis LeRow           132’ 10.68” @ 2.4 mph

1100 lb.

1st-Ernie Herrara             156’ 3.84” 3.8 mph

2nd-Ed Higley                           150’ 3.48” @ 3.5 mph

3rd-Mike Mellenbruch              149’ 4.44” @ 3.7 mph

1200 lb.

1st-Ernie Herrara             158’ 8.88” @ 3.8 mph

2nd-Mike Mellenbruch              153’ 4.44” @ 3.9 mph

3rd-Ed Higley                            133’ 7.56” @ 3.4 mph

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FROM PASTOR AL ~ Al Schirmacher

Personal 9/11

I was speaking at an elementary chapel when the planes hit.  We decided not to tell the 200+ kids until their parents arrived.

Initially thought small prop plane had hit until returned home, saw devastating pictures.

Tried working, without success.

Our cooperative cancelled its 9/13 Savannah, GA meeting.

Short term, shock and ache.  Bewilderment.  Grief.  

Medium term, we drew closer in prayer.

Long term, my business declined 90%.

Blessing in deep disguise - loss of business led me from part time to full time ministry.

We each have stories, many far more painful than mine.  Feel free to share.

But I will attest, Romans 8:28 & 5:20.

Al Schirmacher

 

have lived five states

visited thirty-six more

(and few countries)

home is what you make

with whom you make but

“homesick at home”

enduring reality for

hearts made for Heaven*

and for One living there 

·                     Biblical Heaven, new heavens and new earth; not insipid, ethereal, clouds and harps/disembodied spirits image we conjure up

 

Al Schirmacher

 

“When Jesus heard what had happened, he withdrew by boat privately to a solitary place. Hearing of this, the crowds followed him on foot from the towns. When Jesus landed and saw a large crowd, he had compassion on them and healed their sick.” Matthew 14:13-14 NIV

John the Baptist, Jesus’ partner in ministry, had just been murdered.

Jesus’ reaction?  Get away for a time.

If this was Jesus’ reaction, our desire to be alone after loss is validated.

But...do notice it didn’t stay that way for long.

Al Schirmacher

 

Christian friend,

Many love to pray this prayer -

 ““This, then, is how you should pray: “ ‘Our Father in heaven, hallowed be your name, your kingdom come, your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.

And forgive us our debts, as we also have forgiven our debtors. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from the evil one. ’” Matthew 6:9-10, 12-13 NIV

Read today - should have thought of this before - that when we do pray this prayer, we are committing to:

·                     Personally hallow (make holy) His name

·                     Personally submit to His reign

·                     Personally do His will

We can hardly pray for these without participating.

Sobering!

Al Schirmacher

 

we like our names 

Bill George Alice Mary

even our last names

Smith Jones Beatty Schirmacher

we wonder why 

God would rename us -

unless of course

John Bunyan got it right

and we’ll glorify Lord

with character names 

Charity Chastity Champion

Mercy- filled or Light-bearer

or just Rescued by Grace 

“Whoever has ears, let them hear what the Spirit says to the churches. To the one who is victorious, I will give some of the hidden manna. I will also give that person a white stone with a new name written on it, known only to the one who receives it.” Revelation 2:17 NIV

Al Schirmacher

 

it’s not what we say

it’s not even our success 

it’s obedience -

listening obedience 

caused by faith by love for Lord 

 ““Not everyone who says to me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will enter the kingdom of heaven, but only the one who does the will of my Father who is in heaven. Many will say to me on that day, ‘Lord, Lord, did we not prophesy in your name and in your name drive out demons and in your name perform many miracles?’ Then I will tell them plainly, ‘I never knew you. Away from me, you evildoers!’” Matthew 7:21-23 NIV

 “What good is it, my brothers and sisters, if someone claims to have faith but has no deeds? Can such faith save them? Suppose a brother or a sister is without clothes and daily food. If one of you says to them, “Go in peace; keep warm and well fed,” but does nothing about their physical needs, what good is it? In the same way, faith by itself, if it is not accompanied by action, is dead. But someone will say, “You have faith; I have deeds.” Show me your faith without deeds, and I will show you my faith by my deeds. You believe that there is one God. Good! Even the demons believe that—and shudder.” James 2:14-19 NIV

Al Schirmacher 

 

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Eve of Harvest ~ Kim Baldwin, McPherson County farmer and rancher

The other day Facebook reminded me that a year ago we kicked off our fall harvest season. I had posted a picture of the kids climbing into the combine with my husband, and then a picture of the four of us piled in the combine with smiles on our faces. It’s always an exciting day when we fire up the combines and move into the fields.

It means we have a crop to harvest. It also means adding many extra miles on my vehicle. 

My mother-in-law and I will begin taking evening meals out to the field. I’ll begin reading books to my kids in the car while waiting for a combine to make its return to our side of the field. You might catch us some evenings driving slowly down a dirt road with our windows down blowing goodnight kisses to my husband because the kids won’t see him again until breakfast. It means driving out to a field and excitedly showing everyone when someone has lost a tooth, or celebrating being selected as the Star of the Day at school, or  showing off the newest piece of art that was completed in class, or displaying a birthday card that arrived in the mail.

Yes, we spend a lot of time in the car this time of year. I’m always impressed the kids handle it so well. For them, it’s just a normal part of being a farm kid in the fall. After all, it is how they’ve spent every harvest since before they were even born.

Some days we’ll run home after school and change our clothes before heading out to the field, but more days than not, we go straight to where the crew is. It gives the kids extra time to ride alongside their dad or grandpa, to honk the combine’s horn, to “help” unload the grain by pushing buttons and pulling levers, or to just supervise the entire operation.

We try to keep a routine during harvest for the kids. Many evenings I’ll try to get them in the car and headed home before it’s dark. We’ll still have homework, bath time and stories before I put them to bed. But sometimes exceptions have to be made. 

There are some evenings when the kids need extra daddy time, so I’ll ignore the setting sun or the time on the clock. Some days we’ll have to make a trip back out to a field after dark in our jammies because a little one needs to see their daddy one more time before bed and Facetime just isn’t cutting it. 

Fall harvest will lead into wheat sowing followed by more fall harvest. The goal is to be completely done by Thanksgiving. Last year we went a few days past that.

Regardless of when the harvest is completed this year, you can bet my kiddos and I will have some quality time driving to and from fields this fall. We will be completing reading assignments while waiting for the crew to come to the edge of the field for a meal, enjoying the cool and crisp weather that will soon be here, and I’ll be snapping a picture every once in a while to document our trips out to the fields.

Yes, it’s the eve of fall harvest and we’re ready to begin this season.

"Insight" is a weekly column published by Kansas Farm Bureau, the state's largest farm organization whose mission is to strengthen agriculture and the lives of Kansans through advocacy, education and service. 

 

OBITUARIES

Bonnie G. Hargrove, 92, of Atchison, KS, formally of Effingham, KS died Saturday, September 14, 2019 peacefully at her home.

Funeral services will be 11:00 AM on Thursday, September 19th, 2019 at Effingham Union Church, with Rev. Jeff Cochran officiating. Burial will follow at the Evergreen Cemetery in Effingham, KS. Family will receive friends from 6:00PM to 7:30 PM on Wednesday, September 18th, 2019 at the Becker- Dyer- Stanton Funeral Home, Atchison. Memorials are suggested to the Effingham Union Church and may be sent in care of the funeral home.  Words of comfort and remembrance may be left online at www.beckerdyer.com.

Bonnie G. Leason was born on March 5, 1927 in Atchison, KS the daughter of Gale Martin and Betty (Bomar) Leason. She graduated from Atchison High School in 1945 where she was a cheerleader and played in the High School Band.  Bonnie was married to Richard D. ”Dick” Hargrove on September 22, 1945 in Troy, KS. Mr. Hargrove preceded her in death on February 25, 2008. Bonnie was a homemaker and raised two daughters. She was a member of the Effingham Union Church, was a past president of the PTA, served as a Girl Scout Leader and member of the Ruth Circle. She enjoyed sewing, reading, watching baseball games, and playing canasta.

Survivors include two daughters: Jacqueline K. (Ron) Porter-Teare, of Yukon, OK, Vickie L. (David) Swiercinsky, of Wellington, FL, three grandchildren; Brian (Amanda) Porter, Bret Porter, Jared (Ana)Toney , two step grandchildren, Todd and Chad Swiercinsky and six great grandchildren; David Castro, Martin Mannion, twins – Sofia and Eleanor Toney, Mason W. Porter, and Cooper S. Porter, one step great grandchild, Keria Mourad. She is preceded in death by her parents, husband, a granddaughter Sonya Toney-Smith, a step grandson TJ Swiercinsky and sister Bettie G. Linscott.

 

William G. “Bill” Barthel, 98, Atchison, Kansas, died Sunday, September 8, 2019, at Atchison Medicalodge.

Mass of Christian burial was Saturday, September 14, 2019, at 10:00 a.m. at St. Joseph’s Church with Rev. Jeremy Heppler, OSB as celebrant. Interment followed in Mt. Olive Cemetery, Troy, Kansas. A parish rosary was recited on Friday, September 13th at 6:00 p.m. with visitation following at the Arensberg-Pruett Funeral Home. Memorial contributions are suggested to St. Benedict Catholic School Endowment or St. Croix Hospice and may be left in care of the funeral home. The Arensberg-Pruett Funeral Home has been entrusted with final care.

Bill was born August 6, 1921, in Leavenworth, Kansas, the son of William P. and Edna (Whitley) Barthel. He attended St. Benedict’s Grade School and Atchison High School.

He and Doris Lucille Congrove were united in marriage on November 9, 1941, at the St. Mark’s Lutheran Church Parsonage. Mrs. Barthel preceded him in death on February 2, 2002.

Bill enlisted in the United States Army Infantry on February 1, 1943 and served until his honorable discharge on March 10, 1946.

Prior to his enlistment in the Army, Bill was employed with Blair Milling of Atchison. When he returned from Active Duty, Bill went to work at Blish-Mize & Sillman as a local truck driver.  He served in this capacity for 38 years, retiring in 1984. Bill was a hard worker. This trait was instilled in him at a young age as he worked for a barber shop, going in each morning to sweep the floors and wash windows before school.

Bill was a member of St. Benedict Parish attending St. Joseph’s Church. He liked going to “Coffee Club” at McDonalds and catching up with friends. Bill enjoyed camping and spending time outdoors. He had a passion for riding his motorcycle up and down the highways and byways. In his later years he took up horse riding and enjoyed his horse, Danny.

Survivors include a son, William Alvin (Lois) Barthel, three daughters, Lola (Bill) Wagner, Ruth Barthel, Rose (Johnny) Smith, nine grandchildren, Cindy (Rick) Vanderweide, Chris (Cynthia) Wagner, Tim (Marsha) Wagner, Katie (Willie) Geisendorf, Jeremy Erpelding, Clay (Julie) Barthel, Sarah (Jason) Ricci, Trever (Lisa) Smith, Nathan (Cherise) Smith, and thirty one great grandchildren and five great-great grandchildren.

He was preceded in death by his parents, his wife Doris Lucille, three infant brothers and a grandson Travis Barthel.

 

Jessie Darlene Bottorff, 79, of Horton, KS passed away on Saturday evening, September 14, 2019 at the Hiawatha Community Hospital. She was born on October 6, 1939 in Horton, Kansas, the daughter of Oliver Henry Oswald and Alice (Wenger) Oswald. Jessie married Gary Wayne Bottorff on November 22, 1959, and they had three children, Ronald Wayne, Sharon Kaye, and Rex Allen.

Jessie loved being active in the church, enjoyed gardening, music, singing, and playing piano; she also wrote poetry.

Survivors include her husband, Gary, sons, Ron and Rex and daughter, Sharon. 5 grandchildren, Jessica Marie Zuber (Austin Zuber), Jeremy Wayne Fakes, Cody Allen Bottorff, Hannah Nicole Bottorff and Andrew James Bottorff, brother Floyd Eugene Oswald (Alleta), Sister-in-law Colleen Koso (Mic) and numerous nieces and nephews.

She was preceded in death by her parents, a brother and sister-in-law, Oliver Roger Oswald and (Vivian).

Friends may call the funeral home after 9 a.m. Thursday where the family will receive friends from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. that evening.

A celebration of Jessie’s life will be held Friday, September 20, 2019 at the Muscotah United Church at 10 a.m. Burial will be at the Horton Cemetery following. Memorials may be made to the Muscotah Cancer Support Group and may be sent in care of the Dishon-Maple-Chaney Mortuary 909 Central Ave Horton, KS 66439.

 

GOVERNMENTAL NEWS

Unapproved Minutes of the September 10 Atchison Co. Commission Meeting

Pursuant to the law, the Atchison County Commission Board met in Regular Session at 1:00 PM on the 1st floor of the courthouse, 423 N 5th St. Atchison, KS. Vice Chairman Eric Noll called the meeting to order with Commissioner Henry W. Pohl and County Counselor Patrick Henderson present for the meeting. Chairman Jack Bower was absent. Deputy County Clerk, Linda Chalfant recorded the minutes.

The Board recited the pledge of allegiance to start the meeting.

*Public Comment:

The minutes of the September 3rd, 2019 meeting were reviewed with one correction noted. Commissioner Pohl made a motion to approve the minutes as corrected. Vice Chairman Noll seconded the motion. Vice Chairman Noll called for a vote, all voted aye. The motion passed 2-0.

*Commissioner Comments and Committee Reports:

Commissioner Pohl reported that the repairs are going to start to the roof on Project Concern building in Effingham. They have received a grant and are moving forward on the repairs.

Vice Chairman Noll attended an Area Agency on Aging meeting Thursday Sept 5, 2019 in Hiawatha. Their offices were flooded and are considering their options for possible different office if they can’t get it fixed. Vice Chairman Noll was selected to help their site committee on this.

Vice Chairman Noll was made aware that there is another vacancy or opening on the Area Agency on Aging Committee that Atchison County can fill. It was stated by County Counselor Patrick Henderson that in the past letters of interest were requested. Vice Chairman Noll is going to work on this.

Vice Chairman Noll reported he attended a Multi-County Health meeting Monday September 9, 2019 in Atchison, everything seems to be going fine, profitable, and nothing new to report

*New Business Before the Board:

Vice Chairman Noll stated September is Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, and read a proclamation that the Board will be happy to put forth. Commissioner Pohl made a motion to proclaim September as Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, Vice Chairman Noll seconded the motion. Vice Chairman Noll called for a vote, all voted aye, motion carried 2-0.

It was also stated that the light tower will be changed to Gold in honor of Childhood Cancer Awareness Month.

Wes Lanter, Emergency Management, provided an email with an Emergency Management Performance Grant (EMPG) application, to be approved and signed by the Board. The grant is for $20,560.00, and is the grant that pays for the CodeRed system, along with information and supplies to help inform the public on how to be prepared for emergencies. Commissioner Pohl made a motion to approve the application for the amount of $20,560.00. Vice Chairman Noll seconded the motion. Vice Chairman Noll called for a vote, all voted aye, motion carried 2-0.

Roger Denton, GIS Coordinator appeared for bid opening on the low water crossing repair project on 254th Road. The County received three bids:  Martin Construction $46,400.00; Marlatt Construction $77,265.00 and Wagner Excavating $30,625.00

Coordinator Denton stated that the apparent low bidder was Wagner Excavating.

Coordinator Denton explained that he would like a week to review the bids and visit further with Mr. Wagner, then give the board his recommendation. Further, the County still needs to obtain written right-of-way for the project. Counselor Henderson was asked to look into obtaining the Right-of-Way.

*Old Business

There was no old business to discuss.

*Public Comment

Bills were presented to be signed.

Add abate, escapes for real estate and personal property taxes were presented to be approved.

Commissioner Pohl made a motion to adjourn the meeting at 1:14 pm. Vice Chairman Noll seconded the motion. Vice Chairman called for a vote, all voted aye. The motion carried 2-0.

Note: Once approved these minutes will be the official minutes of the Board of County Commissioners. Regular meetings of the Board of County Commissioners are video recorded.

The video of these meeting is generally available for supplementation of the minutes. The videos can be located under the Government tab at www.atchisoncountyks.org.

Attest: Linda Chalfant, Deputy County Clerk

 

EPA, U.S. Army Repeal 2015 Rule Defining “Waters of the United States” Ending Regulatory Patchwork

(Lenexa, Kan., Thursday, September 12, 2019) – At an event in Washington, D.C., U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Andrew Wheeler and Department of the Army Assistant Secretary for Civil Works R.D. James announced that the agencies are repealing a 2015 rule that impermissibly expanded the definition of “waters of the United States” (WOTUS) under the Clean Water Act. The agencies are also recodifying the longstanding and familiar regulatory text that existed prior to the 2015 Rule—ending a regulatory patchwork that required implementing two competing Clean Water Act regulations, which has created regulatory uncertainty across the United States.

“Today, EPA and the Department of the Army finalized a rule to repeal the previous administration’s overreach in the federal regulation of U.S. waters and recodify the longstanding and familiar regulatory text that previously existed,” said Administrator Wheeler. “Today’s Step 1 action fulfills a key promise of President Trump and sets the stage for Step 2 – a new WOTUS definition that will provide greater regulatory certainty for farmers, landowners, home builders, and developers nationwide.”

“Today, Administrator Wheeler and I signed a final rule that repeals the 2015 Rule and restores the previous regulatory regime exactly how it existed prior to finalization of the 2015 Rule,” said Assistant Secretary James. “Before this final rule, a patchwork of regulations existed across the country as a result of various judicial decisions enjoining the 2015 Rule. This final rule reestablishes national consistency across the country by returning all jurisdictions to the longstanding regulatory framework that existed prior to the 2015 Rule, which is more familiar to the agencies, States, Tribes, local governments, regulated entities, and the public while the agencies engage in a second rulemaking to revise the definition of ‘waters of the United States.’”

“By repealing this rule and redefining ‘waters of the U.S.’, we’ll provide greater regulatory certainty and clarity to our nation’s landowners, farmers, and businesses,” said EPA Region 7 Administrator Jim Gulliford. “In doing so, we’re able to help our agricultural community be economically successful, while we continue our work together to protect the quality of our waters for generations to come.”

Today’s rule is the first step in a two-step rulemaking process to define the scope of “waters of the United States” that are regulated under the Clean Water Act. Step 1 provides regulatory certainty as to the definition of “waters of the United States” following years of litigation surrounding the 2015 Rule. The two federal district courts that have reviewed the merits of the 2015 Rule found that the rule suffered from certain errors and issued orders remanding the 2015 Rule back to the agencies. Multiple other federal district courts have preliminarily enjoined the 2015 Rule pending a decision on the merits of the rule. In this action, EPA and the Army jointly conclude that multiple substantive and procedural errors warrant a repeal of the 2015 Rule. For example, the 2015 Rule:

•             Did not implement the legal limits on the scope of the agencies’ authority under the Clean Water Act as intended by Congress and reflected in Supreme Court cases.

•             Failed to adequately recognize, preserve, and protect the primary responsibilities and rights of states to manage their own land and water resources.

•             Approached the limits of the agencies’ constitutional and statutory authority absent a clear statement from Congress.

•             Suffered from certain procedural errors and a lack of adequate record support as it relates to the 2015 Rule’s distance-based limitations.

With this final repeal, the agencies will implement the pre-2015 regulations, which are currently in place in more than half of the states, informed by applicable agency guidance documents and consistent with Supreme Court decisions and longstanding agency practice. The final rule takes effect 60 days after publication in the Federal Register.

In December 2018, EPA and the Army proposed a new definition—Step 2—that would clearly define where federal jurisdiction begins and ends in accordance with the Clean Water Act and Supreme Court precedent. In the proposal, the agencies provide a clear definition of the difference between federally regulated waterways and those waters that rightfully remain solely under state authority.

Additional information is available at: http://www.epa.gov/wotus-rule.

Background

The final Step 1 rule follows President Trump’s Executive Order 13778, “Restoring the Rule of Law, Federalism, and Economic Growth by Reviewing the ‘Waters of the United States’ Rule.” Section 1 of the Executive Order states that “[i]t is in the national interest to ensure that the Nation’s navigable waters are kept free from pollution, while at the same time promoting economic growth, minimizing regulatory uncertainty, and showing due regard for the roles of Congress and the States under the Constitution.” The Executive Order also directs the EPA and the Department of the Army to review the 2015 Rule for consistency with the policy outlined in Section 1 of the order and to issue a proposed rule rescinding or revising the 2015 Rule as appropriate and consistent with law.

 

Kansas Part Of Multistate Investigation Into Google Business Practices

TOPEKA – (September 9, 2019) – Kansas is part of a multistate investigation of tech giant Google’s business practices in accordance with state and federal antitrust laws, Attorney General Derek Schmidt announced today.

Schmidt said his office is one of 50 state and territory attorneys general participating in the joint investigation into whether Google’s overarching control of online advertising markets and search traffic may have led to anticompetitive behavior that harms consumers. The bipartisan investigation was formally announced today.

“Today I am taking the unusual step of announcing an ongoing investigation,” said Schmidt, who noted that the ordinary practice of his office is to neither confirm nor deny whether an investigation exists. “In light of the heightened public scrutiny and policy discussions surrounding the business practices at Google and other major tech companies, as well as the decision by several other state attorneys general to publicly announce the investigation today, I have concluded it is in the public interest to confirm that Kansas has been and remains part of this effort.”

Past investigations of Google uncovered violations ranging from advertising illegal drugs in the United States to antitrust actions brought by the European Commission. None of these previous investigations, however, fully addresses the source of Google’s sustained market power and its ability to protect and maintain that power.  

 

AG Derek Schmidt: Texas Company Fined For Violating No-Call Act

TOPEKA – (September 10, 2019) – A Texas company has been ordered to pay $10,000 in penalties and fees for violating the No-Call Act, Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt said today.

Touchstone Communications-II, LLC, of Hurst, Texas, agreed to a consent judgment ordering it to pay $10,000 in fees and civil penalties. The judgment was approved September 4 by Judge Teresa Watson in Shawnee County District Court. In addition, the company was enjoined from further violations of the Kansas No-Call Act and the Kansas Consumer Protection Act.

“We continue to vigorously pursue violations of the Kansas No-Call Act,” Schmidt said. “Kansans who have signed up for the Do-Not-Call list have an expectation that their privacy will be respected. We will enforce the law against those telemarketers who violate it.”

The attorney general’s Consumer Protection Division began investigating Touchstone Communications-II, LLC, after receiving complaints from Kansas consumers about receiving unsolicited telemarketing calls. The complaints alleged that company employees were calling Kansas consumers on the Do-Not-Call registry.

A copy of the consent judgment is available at https://bit.ly/2m1pO3p.

Kansans who wish to register for the national Do-Not-Call list, or to report an alleged violation of the No-Call Act, should visit the Attorney General’s website at www.InYourCornerKansas.org.  

 

345 Crime Victims To Receive Support

TOPEKA – (September 13, 2019) – The Kansas Crime Victims Compensation Board yesterday awarded financial assistance to 345 victims of violent crime at its September meeting, Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt said.

Awards were made in 193 new cases. Additional expenses were paid in 152 previously submitted cases. The awards totaled $280,391.88.

The Division of Crime Victims Compensation in Schmidt’s office administers the Crime Victims Compensation program, which was established in 1978 to help victims of violent crime pay for their unexpected expenses such as medical treatment, mental health counseling, lost wages, dependent support and funeral expenses.

The state’s three-member Crime Victims Compensation Board determines claims that are eligible for payment and how much money will be awarded to each claimant. Awards are limited to a maximum total amount of $25,000 with limitations of $5,000 for funeral expense, $5,000 for outpatient mental health counseling, $10,000 for inpatient mental health treatment and $1,500 for grief counseling for family survivors of homicide victims.

A portion of assessed court costs and fines, inmate wages, parole fees and restitution paid by convicted offenders provides funding to the program.

For more information about the Crime Victims Compensation program call (785) 296-2359 or visit the attorney general’s website at www.ag.ks.gov

 

Texas Company Fined For Violating No-Call Act

TOPEKA – (September 10, 2019) – A Texas company has been ordered to pay $10,000 in penalties and fees for violating the No-Call Act, Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt said today.

Touchstone Communications-II, LLC, of Hurst, Texas, agreed to a consent judgment ordering it to pay $10,000 in fees and civil penalties. The judgment was approved September 4 by Judge Teresa Watson in Shawnee County District Court. In addition, the company was enjoined from further violations of the Kansas No-Call Act and the Kansas Consumer Protection Act.

“We continue to vigorously pursue violations of the Kansas No-Call Act,” Schmidt said. “Kansans who have signed up for the Do-Not-Call list have an expectation that their privacy will be respected. We will enforce the law against those telemarketers who violate it.”

The attorney general’s Consumer Protection Division began investigating Touchstone Communications-II, LLC, after receiving complaints from Kansas consumers about receiving unsolicited telemarketing calls. The complaints alleged that company employees were calling Kansas consumers on the Do-Not-Call registry.

A copy of the consent judgment is available at https://bit.ly/2m1pO3p.

Kansans who wish to register for the national Do-Not-Call list, or to report an alleged violation of the No-Call Act, should visit the Attorney General’s website at www.InYourCornerKansas.org.  

 

Kansas Part Of Multistate Investigation Into Google Business Practices

TOPEKA – (September 9, 2019) – Kansas is part of a multistate investigation of tech giant Google’s business practices in accordance with state and federal antitrust laws, Attorney General Derek Schmidt announced today.

Schmidt said his office is one of 50 state and territory attorneys general participating in the joint investigation into whether Google’s overarching control of online advertising markets and search traffic may have led to anticompetitive behavior that harms consumers. The bipartisan investigation was formally announced today.

“Today I am taking the unusual step of announcing an ongoing investigation,” said Schmidt, who noted that the ordinary practice of his office is to neither confirm nor deny whether an investigation exists. “In light of the heightened public scrutiny and policy discussions surrounding the business practices at Google and other major tech companies, as well as the decision by several other state attorneys general to publicly announce the investigation today, I have concluded it is in the public interest to confirm that Kansas has been and remains part of this effort.”

Past investigations of Google uncovered violations ranging from advertising illegal drugs in the United States to antitrust actions brought by the European Commission. None of these previous investigations, however, fully addresses the source of Google’s sustained market power and its ability to protect and maintain that power.  

 

Homicide Investigation In Rooks County

ROOKS COUNTY– The Kansas Bureau of Investigation (KBI) and the Rooks County Sheriff’s Office are investigating a homicide that occurred near Plainville, Kan.

The Rooks County Sheriff’s Office requested KBI assistance at approximately 10 a.m. on Monday, Sept. 9. Special agents and the Crime Scene Response Team responded.

The Rooks County Sheriff’s Office received a 911 call around 9:10 a.m. Monday morning when a family member went to 2610 19th Rd. in rural Rooks County and found 56-year-old Mark E. Reif deceased inside his home. Deputies arrived at the residence around 9:20 a.m. and discovered that Reif had died from gunshot wounds.

Anyone with information about this crime is asked to call the KBI at 1-800-KS-CRIME, or the Rooks County Sheriff’s Office at (785) 425-6312. Callers may remain anonymous.

The investigation is ongoing. Nothing further will be released at this time.

 

Sen. Moran Statement on the Confirmation of Miki Bowman

to a Full Term on the Federal Reserve Board of Governors

WASHINGTON – U.S. Senator Jerry Moran (R-Kan.) – member of the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs – today released the following statement after the Senate confirmed Kansan Michelle ‘Miki’ Bowman on a 60-31 vote to serve on the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System for a full, 14-year term:

“Miki Bowman has distinguished herself as an important leader in the banking community. In her short time on the Federal Reserve Board of Governors, she has already brought a critical perspective to our nation’s monetary policy with experience as both a community banker and supervisor of community banks. I know that Miki will continue to give a voice to the ag community and rural America, and I am pleased the Senate confirmed her to a full term.”

Bowman – a Washburn University School of Law graduate and Council Grove native – joined the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System as the Community Bank Representative in November of 2018 and has represented Region 8, which holds jurisdiction over St. Louis, Mo., for the remainder of a 14-year term expiring January 31, 2020. The nomination passed by the Senate today is for a full term of 14 years beginning on February 1, 2020.

Items to note:

·                    In May 2018, Sen. Moran praised Ms. Bowman during her confirmation hearing before the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs

·                    In June 2018, Sen. Moran delivered floor remarks urging his colleagues to support her nomination to fill out the remainder of an unexpired term on the Federal Reserve Board of Governors.

·                    In November 2018, Sen. Moran voted to confirm Ms. Bowman to the Federal Reserve Board of Governors.

 

Sen. Moran Announces 2019 Service Academy Selection Board

Selection Board will review applications and interview candidates for admission to U.S. Service Academies

WASHINGTON – U.S. Senator Jerry Moran (R-Kan.) today announced members of his 2019 Service Academy Selection Board. The 20-member board will review applications and interview candidates who are applying for admission to U.S. Service Academies.

“One of the greatest responsibilities I have as a United States Senator is to nominate Kansas students to attend service academies,” said Sen. Moran “I am proud of these young students for their desire to serve our nation, and I’m grateful to my Service Academy Selection Board for the thoughtful consideration they put into the application process. These students applying to enter service academies represent the best of Kansas, and I look forward to receiving the selection board’s recommendations and meeting with students in Hutchinson.”

Applications will be reviewed and selected applicants will be interviewed by the selection board on Saturday, September 21 at the Cosmosphere in Hutchinson. The U.S. Service Academies include the U.S. Military Academy, U.S. Naval Academy, U.S. Air Force Academy and U.S. Merchant Marine Academy.

Media are invited to attend the event. Questions about the event may be directed to Trenton_Kennedy@moran.senate.gov.

Members of the 2019 Service Academy Selection Board include:

·                     Lt. Col. (RET) Bob Brock of Topeka – Director of Aviation, Kansas Department of Transportation, U.S. Air Force veteran;

·                     Myca Bunch of Garden City – President, Garden City Area Chamber of Commerce, U.S. Air Force veteran;

·                     LTC (Ret) Larry Burks, Sr., of Wichita – Director, Military and Veteran Services, Wichita State University, U.S. Army veteran;

·                     Dennis Butler of Manhattan – Director, Riley County Police Department;

·                     COL John Cluck of Wathena – Mayor, City of Wathena, Vice Commander, 139th Airlift Wing, Missouri Air National Guard;

·                     Ardith Dunn, Ph.D., of Satanta – Retired high school mathematics/computer instructor, K-12 superintendent, mother of U.S. Air Force Academy graduate;

·                     Michael Farris, M.D., of Altamont – Emergency Physician, Freeman Neosho Hospital, Served in the U.S. Air Force Reserves;

·                     Sue Givens of El Dorado – Field Specialist, Kansas Association of School Boards, Retired K-12 superintendent;

·                     Robin Jackson, Ph.D., of Hutchinson – Central Christian College Professor of Science and Mathematics;

·                     Cheryl Kerns of Overland Park – Blue Valley West High School teacher, mother of U.S. Military Academy graduate;

·                     Brian Kessens of Overland Park – Tortoise Capital managing director, U.S. Military Academy graduate;

·                     Katrina Lewison of Manhattan – USD 383 Board of Education Member, Purple Heart recipient, U.S. Military Academy graduate;

·                     Jayne Humphrey Pearce of Wallace – Wallace County Visitors Bureau Marketing and Tourism Director, U.S. Air Force veteran, mother of U.S. Air Force Academy graduate;

·                     Rachael Pitchford of Dodge City – Assistant Principal, Comanche Middle School, U.S. Marine Corps veteran;

·                     Sean Ritchie of Wichita – Cargill North American Operations Lead, U.S. Merchant Marine Academy graduate;

·                     Halley Roberson of Oberlin – City Administrator, City of Oberlin, U.S. Army veteran;

·                     Mike Souder of Prairie Village – Dean of Continuing Education, Johnson County Community College, U.S. Military Academy graduate;

·                     Sam Turner of Leawood Retired Shawnee Mission Medical Center CEO, Vietnam War veteran, U.S. Army veteran;

·                     Ron Whitney of Emporia – American Legion member, Veterans of Foreign Wars member, U.S. Army veteran;

·                     Beth Wilson of Girard – Business education teacher, Girard High School, mother of U.S. Naval Academy Midshipman.

 

MISCELLANEOUS PRESS RELEASES

Fort Hays State earns top-5 national ranking

HAYS, Kan. – Fort Hays State University, with almost a third of its enrollment over the age of 25, has been recognized for being among the best four-year colleges in the United States for modern students.

This marks the second consecutive year the university earned top-10 honors in Washington Monthly magazine’s annual Best Colleges for Adult Learners rankings. Fort Hays State University President, Tisa Mason, believes this recognition is again the result of the university’s keen focus on meeting the needs of the modern adult learner.

“Serving the needs of the non-traditional learner has long been the focus of our university,” she said. “Whether our students pursue their educational goals on campus in Hays, online, or in their hometown, they all benefit from the unique blend of academic challenge, personal attention and unmatched affordability that are the hallmarks of a Fort Hays State University experience.”

Fort Hays State University is the only public university in Kansas to earn a top-100 ranking. MidAmerica Nazarene, a private liberal arts college in Olathe, earned a  No. 46 ranking.

“Over the last 15 years, we’ve steadily added new data to our rankings of what colleges do for their country by promoting social mobility, research, and public service,” said Kevin Carey, director of the Education Policy Program at New America, editor of The Washington Monthly’s 2019 College Guide.

The Monthly used data from several sources: the federal government; the Annual Survey of Colleges; the College Board; and university records on enrollment, graduations and other information.

The magazine considers eight primary criteria in reaching its adult learner rankings:

(1)             Ease of transfer or enrollment: not only how easy it is for students to enroll or transfer in, but also whether students can transfer in at an upper level and whether a transfer advisor is available.

(2)             Flexibility of programs.

(3)             Services available for adult students: financial aid counseling, on-campus daycare, counseling and job placement services and veterans services.

(4)             The percent of adult students (age 25 and older): “the age at which students are automatically considered independent from their parents for financial aid purposes.”

(5)             Graduation rates of part-time students: “part-time graduation rates are more relevant for students who will be juggling work, school, and family obligations all at the same time.”

(6)             Mean earnings of adult students 10 years after entering college: a three-year average of data gathered from the College Scorecard.

(7)             Loan repayment rates of adult students five years after entering repayment: based on a three-year average of College Scorecard data to get a percentage of independent students who “were able to pay down at least $1 of their loan’s principal.”

(8)             Tuition and fees for in-district students: for the adult learner category, a measure of affordability based on federal data rather than a ranking of net prices, which mainly apply to first-time, full-time students.

Fort Hays State was also No. 27 Best Bang for the Buck of the 372 institutions in the 12-state Midwestern Region. This category, separated into five geographic areas, ranks institutions “according to how well they help non-wealthy students attain marketable degrees at affordable prices.” It focuses on the Social Mobility set of criteria from the overall four-year university rankings.

Washington Monthly’s overall four-year rankings are based on three sets of criteria:

•        Ten social mobility measures, including percentage of students graduating within eight years, a first-generation performance rank and a net price rank; the number and success rate of Pell Grant recipients and first-generation students;

•        Two research criteria – total amount of money spent on research and the number of “bachelor’s recipients who go on to receive Ph.D.s, relative to college size”;

•        and five service criteria, two based on the number of alumni who serve in the Peace Corps, another on ROTC service, Work Study funds spent on service grants, AmeriCorps matching grants and voting engagement points.

FHSU was the top institution in Kansas in its category, Master’s Universities, which covered 606 colleges that offer a “significant number” of master’s degrees but few or no doctorates.

The other categories for four-year institutions are National Universities, which award “a significant number of doctoral degrees”; Liberal Arts Colleges, baccalaureate colleges that focus on arts and sciences; and Bachelor’s Colleges, which confer bachelor’s degrees “almost exclusively.”

The Washington Monthly’s full rankings, explanations of methodology and articles on issues in higher education are available at washingtonmonthly.com/magazine/september-october-2019/.

 

TFI Family Services Names New Director of Permanency Services

Topeka, Kansas (September 10, 2019) – TFI Family Services is happy to announce the promotion of Emily Hermesch to Director of Permanency Services.  Emily will be a leader for our specialty services including our training department, parent partner program, IL/IDD specialist, and adoption accelerator.  She will be based out of our Overland Park office. 

Ms. Hermesch received her Master’s Degree from Kansas State University in Family Life Education and Consultation and a Master’s Degree from The University of Kansas in Social Work.  Emily has 16 years’ experience working with children and families and has been part of the TFI Family for a total of 11 years. 

“Emily is dedicated to providing quality services to children and families.  Her experience in foster care, case management, and therapeutic interventions for children and families will be a great addition to our specialty services”, stated Kathy Jorgensen, Vice President of Permanency Services.

TFI Family Services Names New Vice President of Permanency Services

Topeka, Kansas (September 10, 2019) – TFI Family Services is pleased to announce that Tabitha Reavis has been named Vice President of Permanency Services.  Tabitha will oversee the development and daily functions of the Family Permanency Program for Catchment Area 4 of the DCF East Region (primarily Southeast Kansas), as well as be responsible for the day to day operation of Case Management services in Area 4. 

Ms. Reavis graduated from Thayer High School (1993) and continued her higher education at Pittsburg State University (1997) earning a Bachelors in Social Work  as well as a Masters in Social Work from the University of Kansas (2002).  Tabitha has over 20 years’ experience in child welfare and child welfare program administration, as well as a background in behavioral health and substance abuse treatment.  She will be headquartered in our Pittsburg, Kansas office. 

“Tabitha brings a significant amount of knowledge in child welfare to TFI’s Family Permanency program.  Having served with TFI for 16 years previously, we are glad to have her back in a leadership role as we assume responsibility for child welfare case management services in Catchment Area 4”, said Rachelle Roosevelt, Senior Vice President for Foster Care for TFI. 

About TFI Family Services

TFI Family Services, Inc. is a leading child welfare agency providing experience, compassion, quality

services and care. Our strength as an organization is we do what is best for children and families.  We provide various types of services in the community and have over 50 years of experience in providing child welfare services including foster care services, group home care, case management, independent living, psychiatric residential treatment center, behavioral health, adoption services, visitation services, and aftercare services.

 

WILDLIFE AND PARKS REPORTS

KWPT Commission to Meet September 19 in Great Bend

PRATT – The Kansas Wildlife, Parks and Tourism (KWPT) Commission will conduct its next public meeting on September 19, 2019 at the Kansas Wetlands Education Center, 592 NE K-156 Highway, in Great Bend. All are welcome to attend the meeting, which begins at 1:30 p.m., recesses at 5 p.m., and reconvenes at 6:30 p.m. for a public hearing. Time will be set aside for public comment on non-agenda items at the beginning of both the afternoon and evening sessions.

During the afternoon session, attendees will hear a report on agency and state fiscal status, and general discussion on public lands regulations, antelope and elk regulations, and what to expect in the 2019 Upland Bird Hunting Forecast.

A series of workshop topics – items that may be voted on at a future commission meeting – will follow, including: threatened and endangered species regulations, electronic licensing, fishing regulations, state park regulations, 2020-2021 turkey regulations, and big game regulations.

Commissioners will then recess by 5 p.m. and reconvene at 6:30 p.m. to continue general discussions regarding renovations at Cheyenne Bottoms Wildlife Area, and potential duck zone changes, before voting on the use of electric-assisted bicycles at Kansas state parks.

If necessary, the Commission will reconvene at 9 a.m. at the same location, September 20, 2019, to complete any unfinished business. Should this occur, time will again be set aside for public comment on non-agenda items.

Information about the Commission, including the September 19, 2019 meeting agenda and briefing book, can be downloaded at ksoutdoors.com/KDWPT-Info/Commission.

If notified in advance, the Commission will have an interpreter available for the hearing impaired. To request an interpreter, call the Kansas Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing at 1-800-432-0698. Any individual with a disability may request other accommodations by contacting the Commission secretary at (620) 672-5911.

The next KWPT Commission meeting is scheduled for Thursday, November 14, 2019 at the William Carpenter 4-H Building in Scott City.

 

HISTORY IS FUN ~ Robert & Helen Caplinger

Old news from the 1937 Issues of Effingham New Leaf

LADS ON AN ADVENTURE.  "Bill Kloepper, Winnie Moses, Leslie Chavel and Tommy House returned this week from a two week trip to the northwest and Old Mexico.  They visited 15 different states.  Had only one accident, when the car hit loose gravel and turned over.  A hitchhiker riding with them was cut about the face.  Bill was driving the other fellows were asleep but were wide awake when they struck the bottom of a 15 foot ditch.

"Work, they claim is plentiful and the wages good in the northwest but delay by rains and the high price of living ran them in the hole.  The boys had to pay $1.00 per night for bed and 50c for meals.  They picked peaches in Washington and dug potatoes in Oregon.  An irrigated valley in Oregon, they liked best of all the country they saw.  The boys say grapes are left hanging on the vines in the west better than are sold here on the market and they throw away potatoes better than our best ones.  Hot weather prevailed in the northwest while they could see the snow on the mountains.

"They enjoyed their trip through Yellowstone Park, even though bears did take possession of their car for a time.

"The young men drove over to Old Mexico, a distance of 150 miles and while crossing the desert had the fright of their young lives.  A Mexican drew a knife on them, made a motion to a cigarette.  The boys gave him matches and they went on their way unmolested.  In Mexico they saw the largest saloon bar in the World.

"The trip cost the lads $250 but they declare the experience was worth $1,000.  However, they came back perfectly satisfied to live in Kansas, and perhaps not make such big wages, but have a little profit."

HISTORY FROM GOLDEN WEDDING ANNIVERSARY.  "Mr. Frank Hawk was born at Bakersville, Ohio, June 22, 1863.  When a little boy, he moved with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Hawk to Grinnell, Iowa.  When he was 11 years old, the family came to Kansas.

"Mrs. Hawk, whose maiden name was Julia Covell, was born at Muscatine, Iowa, leaving there when a baby with her parents who moved to Wilton, Kans.  When she was 14 years old her parents moved to Effingham.  The family first lived on the corner where the Rube Hargrove family reside.  Later they moved to the first house that was built on the location now occupied by Mr. and Mrs. Frank Sutter.

"It was here at the home of her parents, her marriage to Mr. Hawk took place.

"Mrs. Hawk remembers that she and other members of her family ate their first meal upon their arrival at the late Aunt Polly Martin's hotel, the house just north of the depot.  Mrs. Martin was a southern woman, noted for her delicious biscuits and cornbread.  She was the grandmother of Mrs. Rollo Taliaferro and Mrs. Chas Carrigan, of Effingham.

"Colonel Benton kept the post office in his own home, the house now occupied by the Lloyd Beatley family.  At that time it stood where the library building is now located.

"The Hawks recall that Mrs. Betty Halligan, of Atchison, lived at the home of Colonel and Mrs. Benton and their home often the scene of parties and happy get-to-gathers.  Entertainment in those days was not so varied as it is now.

"Pat O'Meara ran Effingham's only store at that time and Dennis Begley was a clerk.

"Roads were an unknown quantity and people just cut across the prairie to Effingham, Muscotah or Valley Falls.

Mr. and Mrs. Hawk purchased the tenant farm and over the next several years they lost three of their youngest children to diphtheria.  They sold that farm and 38 years ago purchased  their present farm which has since been their home.

"For many years he was a valuable member of the A.C.C.H.S. Board and their five children are graduates.

"Their daughters, Mrs. Lester Chalfant and Mrs. Norman Bottorff, of Huron, and Mrs. Ernest Edmonds, of Lawrence."  Their sons, Everett and Covell.

DEATHS OF ED W. HOWE AND HIS EX-WIFE MRS. CLARA HOWE.           "E. W. Howe, 84 year old author,  paragrapher and philosopher, died at his home in Atchison, Sunday morning at 2:20, Oct. 2, 1937.  In July, he suffered a stroke of paralysis and from that time on his health declined.  The climax of Mr. Howe's illness occurred Sunday when pneumonia developed.

"Mrs. Clara Howe, 90 years old, who died Wednesday at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Dwight Farnham, at Westport, Conn,. was the divorced wife of Ed Howe, of Atchison, nationally known editor, author and philosopher.  She met Howe while a young printer.  In 1877, following their marriage, the couple moved to Atchison where Howe started the Atchison Globe.  The divorce occurred more than thirty-five years ago.

Beside the daughter they left two sons, Jim of San Francisco and Gene, of Amarillo, Texas."

HONOR ROLL STUDENTS IN 1937.  "Honor roll students at A.C.C.H.S. for the first semester of 1937-38 were: Seniors: Jessie Marie Cassidy, Doris Cline, Bernice Hegland and Homer Yazel.  Juniors: Betty Cocks, Norman McAsey, Jean Noll, Howard Sells and Sally Sewell.  Sophomores: Junior Davies, Marguerite Jackson, Eleanor Kloepper, Betty McClanahan, Carrol Morgan, Raymond Scholz, Robert Wheeler and Kenneth Whittier.  Freshmen: Ronald McClure, Eunice Evelyn Niblo and Laurence Wilson.  Of the list of students, Rob't Wheeler made all A's."

HISTORY FROM OBITUARY OF MABEL HEFFELFINGER.  "Miss Mabel Heffelfinger passed away at St. Luke's hospital, Tuesday, Nov. 16, 1937.

"She was born at Newburg, Cumberland county, Pa., Aug. 19, 1872.  She was 65 years at the time of her death.  She came to Kansas with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Heffelfinger, when 14 years old.

"She is survived by three sisters and four brothers; Miss Nora Heffelfinger, Monmouth, Ill.; Mrs. Elva Hickerson, Kansas City; Mrs. Clara Smith, St. Joe; John Heffelfinger, Newton; Agnew Heffelfinger, Fayetteville, Ark.; Stewart and Harry Heffelfinger, Effingham."

HISTORY FROM THE OBITUARY OF HENRY THORNE.  "Henry Thorne, 66 years old, of Farmington, died Friday, Dec. 10, 1937.

"He was born in England.  He lived with his parents until 1893, when he and Fred Heywood, now of Tonganoxie, came to the United States.  They landed in Winnipeg, Canada, and came to Kansas from there.

"He worked for the late C. D. Hall at Farmington for a number of years, and then farmed the Blair place, now owned by the Stutz brothers.  He also farmed for several years west of Effingham and in 1903 he bought the Ward 80 acres, near Farmington, where he has since made his home.

"His marriage to Miss Eliza Bailey took place April 4, 1903.

"Mr. Thorne was a member of the Church of England.

"Besides his widow, he is survived by 11 children: Mrs. Harvey Fuhrman, Lancaster; Mrs. Fred Matthias, Jr., Robinson; Ernest, Francis, Alice, John, Arlene, Eugene, Bobby and Glen, all of the home.  There are eight grandchildren.  Of his 12 brothers and sisters, only two sisters, Mrs. Emma Tucker, of England and Mrs. Rose Gold, of Saskatchewan, Canada, and three brothers, Edwin Thorne, of Lancaster, and Louis and Froude, of England, survive.

"Interment in Mt. Vernon cemetery in Atchison."

HISTORY FROM THE OBITUARY OF SHERMAN HAWK.  "Sherman Hawk passed away at his home eight miles southeast of Meridan Dec. 13, 1937.

"Mr. Hawk, oldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Hawk, pioneer settlers, was born Aug. 25, 1864 near Bakersville, Ohio, and moved with his parents to a farm northwest of Effingham in the early 80s.

"Mr. and Mrs. Hawk began housekeeping on a farm in the Sunny Hill neighborhood, three miles northwest of Effingham.  Later they purchased a farm nearby.  For many years they resided in Effingham where Mr. Hawk was an assistant postmaster and substitute carrier on the two Effingham rural routes.

"Mr. Hawk moved from this locality over 18 years ago to Topeka, where he purchased a nice modern home.  After living there a few years, he bought the farm near Meriden, which has since been his home.

"Mr. Hawk for some time had been unable to do farm work, so his son Lloyd moved nearby to take charge of his father's farm.

"Besides his widow and son named, he is survived by two daughters, Miss Elizabeth Hawk and Mrs. Walter Bowman."

 

"GUESS WHO"

 LAST WEEK

Last week's Photo was a picture of the 1959 ACCHS Homecoming Queen Marjorie Buttron.

 

    Problems with this web site contact cap@thenewsleaf.com Last updated 9-17-2019

 

 

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